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Medical translation please


David

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I have just returned home after having an echographie, and I have been trying to translate the report.

I have not had much success, and I only succeded in frightening myself.  I would be grateful if someone could give me a proper translation, as I cannot see the GP till next week - unusually for France he is fully booked.

Report deleted after receiving some very sensible advice by PM.

This forum really is wonderful, with some wonderful and helpful people contributing.

David

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Well, David, "adenopathy" is what - when I was a kid - used to be referred to as swollen glands (below the jawbone in your case): See

http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/a/adenopathy/basics.htm

Usually caused by an infection (although sometimes not) - DON'T PANIC!  If you want a fuller translation, I'll do one happily, but Clair would be a better bet.

You have pm.

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Hello;

The examination shows a bulky /enlarged lymph gland situated in front of the left Parotid Salivary Gland measuring 14mm diametre.

The Parotid and Sub-Mandibular Salivary glands are not involved.

There are also atheromatous plaques in the carotid Artery ( not uncommon!)

Conclusion - an enlarged sub mandibular lymph gland.

 

 

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[quote user="David"]

Doesn't sound too bad.  Will wait till Monday to see what to do about it.

[/quote]

Your GP should be sent a copy of the report and suggested future action written by the Doctor who did the echograph - or rather this is what happened 2 weeks ago when my OH had an echograph on 26th December or what would have been Boxing Day  if we had still been in the UK. Our GP rang us and asked us to call in to the surgery to discuss the report.

Sue

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[quote user="spg"][quote user="David"]

Doesn't sound too bad.  Will wait till Monday to see what to do about it.

[/quote]

Your GP should be sent a copy of the report and suggested future action written by the Doctor who did the echograph - or rather this is what happened 2 weeks ago when my OH had an echograph on 26th December or what would have been Boxing Day  if we had still been in the UK. Our GP rang us and asked us to call in to the surgery to discuss the report.

Sue

[/quote]

Every time I've had a scan or blood test or consultant appt ( and I've had quite a few over the last 5+ years) I've been given a second copy to pass on to my GP ie: it's not sent directly to them but left to me to pass on.

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[quote user="Lisleoise"]

Every time I've had a scan or blood test or consultant appt I've been given a second copy to pass on to my GP ie: it's not sent directly to them but left to me to pass on. [/quote]

We get a copy but the second copy is sent directly to our GP. Your experiences are interesting - perhaps it is a regional thing or the latest practice as OH has only very very recently developed problems here.

Sue

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I find that very strange as it is the doctor who orders the tests and as far as I know also receives the results.

One cannot expect the patient to be aware of each and every anomalie that may occur,or to understand fully the results of complex blood tests, scans etc which may - or may not - need further investigation.

Maybe it was something that happened before the médecin traitant became the norm? even so the idea of sending a patient for a test and not knowing if or when you (the doctor)  might get the result is quite frightening.

Lisleoise - I am not doubting your experience it's just as a doctor I find it bizarre.

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Have lived in France for 18 years and every time I have been referred for tests etc I have been given the results and had to take them to my doctor. I thought it was normal (with a shrug of course) Getting quite good at deciphering blood tests.
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[quote user="Nickel"]

I find that very strange as it is the doctor who orders the tests and as far as I know also receives the results.

One cannot expect the patient to be aware of each and every anomalie that may occur,or to understand fully the results of complex blood tests, scans etc which may - or may not - need further investigation.

Maybe it was something that happened before the médecin traitant became the norm? even so the idea of sending a patient for a test and not knowing if or when you (the doctor)  might get the result is quite frightening.

Lisleoise - I am not doubting your experience it's just as a doctor I find it bizarre.

[/quote]

Sorry to go off track a bit (And a bit of a rant) but I like the French way. Shouldn’t a patient be in the position (if they want to) to know whats going on with their own body?  I’ve found that many doctors in the UK simply gloss over results giving vague answers to questions as if they are afraid of giving  information to the patient.  Whilst I appreciate that it will often require the doctor to explain details, and perhaps might cause some initial anxiety (particularly with diagnostic tests) it does give a starting point for the consultation.

In my own experience results have almost always also been sent to the doctor, faxed if necessary, so urgent ones are received before the patient (I have taken two directly: routine eye and stress tests both marked clearly NAD)

I have a chronic condition and am very grateful to receive my own copies. In the long run it is not the doctor who is in daily control and  it is not her who will be the one  to suffer the consequences of poor management. To do it  successfully, I  feel one needs to know and understand ones own test results.  With routine tests I can sometimes point out trends to my doctor since I only have to deal with myself. With non routine tests,  websites such as lab tests online help explain the purpose of the test and put me in a postion to ask relevant questions.  Being aware of the results  makes my regular consultations far more productive and puts me in a better position to understand the reasons for any  suggested changes to my treatment plan. 

 

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It is common practice to either send the test results to the doctor as well as the patient, or to send them in duplicate to the patient to be taken to the doctor.

I like the idea of being the one in charge of my own health records, and the one keeping all my X-rays, prescriptions, etc. like Helen et al.

I much prefer getting the test results myself too - then I can look everything up. It has its advantages: my husband has 2 medical conditions which require constant monitoring, and I recently noticed an anomalous reading (very low ferritin levels) on a sheet of results, which had gone unnoticed. I urged him to go to his doctor and point this out, and the outcome was that further tests were carried out, confirming my suspicion - eventually this could be treated and is now being carefully monitored.

I find that you cannot always expect the medics to be 100% on top of their job. On another occasion, the generaliste prescribed (still for my husband) an antibiotic which was incompatible with some other medication. He had not been careful enough. Again, I checked and indeed, it was not right and was changed. Sometimes it does help to double-check even after the experts. I am sure that some will think I am a pain in the neck, and a hypochondriac, but I would still rather be sure.

I should also point out that all the professionals I mention are good enough medics, but prone to oversight and not always 100%attentive, just like anybody else.

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I agree entirely - what I am saying is, yes the patient should have a copy of their own test results but at the same time a copy should be sent independently to their doctor ( the person who requested the test- for whatever reason), which does not appear to be the case for some of the posters.

Nobody can be 100% on top of their job and of course you should check your own results and "be in charge of them" but I would hope that  in general  a doctor is more likely to be able to interpret the complexities of some results than somebody who has not received that training.

Regarding your ferritin test - this is not a routine test and is undertaken in response to another finding (eg anaemia) or to monitor iron or total iron in the body and one would have hoped as the test is specifically requested your GP would have at least checked the result.It provides a  good example of interpreting the results - as the normal range is from 12 - 300 mcg/L. so for someone with a level of 13 or someone with a level of 299 (markedly at opposite extremes of "normal")  you have to take into account all the other related tests and clinical history.

Sorry I am getting carried away - but I can imagine a situation where you have a test - maybe not fully understand the results or indeed not even study them ( as I am certain happens) and feel no urgency to see your GP or make a follow-up appointment  and if you are the only one with the results something could be overlooked. I am happier knowing the GP will have seen the results and could if necessary call you back to his surgery.

Sort of belt and braces but I think safer.

 

 

 

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[quote user="Nickel"]

 

Regarding your ferritin test - this is not a routine test and is undertaken in response to another finding (eg anaemia) or to monitor iron or total iron in the body and one would have hoped as the test is specifically requested your GP would have at least checked the result.It provides a  good example of interpreting the results - as the normal range is from 12 - 300 mcg/L. so for someone with a level of 13 or someone with a level of 299 (markedly at opposite extremes of "normal")  you have to take into account all the other related tests and clinical history.

[/quote]

 

Nickel - I fully agree - you (i.e. the patient) should never be the only one to read and assess any lab results! Usually, if 2 copies are sent to the patient, the patient is meant to take one copy to their doctor.

 

As a quick aside, a technical detail: in the case I mentioned, the low ferritin levels did not match the almost normal haemocrit and haemoglobin levels - doing further tests showed that anaemia was present and needed intraveinous treatment over a period of time. Although the medical history and symtpoms showed a distinct possibility of anaemia, the doctor had only looked at haemoglobin and haemocrit levels

(sorry all, end of aside!)

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