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Manuka honey


JohnRoss

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A couple of years ago I saw a tele programme on the myths of 'superfoods' and Manuka Honey was up there with the stars.

And, cos I eat lots of honey and I'm passionate about its source etc, I'm interested in reading about it - and other honeys of course - because if it could help me, I'd be buying it.  And next year, it's bee keeping time.

The bottom line is that, even today after lots of tests etc,  and from what I've read the producers of Manuka have, in the main, either done or sponsored all the 'must have' research that has been done on this stuff, Manuka is nothing different to other honeys.

There is nothing in Manuka Honey that is not found in other honeys and there is no reason why using/eating/sweetening with Manuka Honey should make any more difference to you than Acacia Honey nor any other of the particular - not blended - honeys would.

Broadly, it's good marketing that's made it so special and all this about plastic jars is all just part of the mystique - so how about the absolutely pure honeys that apiarists sell in glass jars, totally not fiddled around with, is that somehow 'damaged'?

Same nonsense as Gojiberries, blueberries etc., it's all about balance in the diet and things like that, not 'superfoods'.

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You're looking at two linked sources John and from what I recall of the first programme on this that I saw, the Honey Research Centre was part funded by one of the main growers of the plant and producers of the honey.  And the BBC link is probably the result of a press release so that means they have something so gain in publicity.

As I said previously in other BBC programmes which discussed superfoods in a scientific and practical way, the Manuka Honey thing was wholly exposed, don't ask me for references, don't have them now but one programme was a health special and the other/s was/were on Channel 4 I seem to think.

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  • 4 weeks later...

JohnRoss, I had some of the Manuka honey the other day. You can by it in M&S, now its a super food with antiseptic properties and dare I say it, tasted lie it to.

Had some on my porridge, not impressed so tried some on toast, no not for me. There are some really good honeys out there (no wasn't talking about you Cat) he he.[;-)]

It had a sort of antseptic taste, like honey mixed with TCP. [+o(]

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I don't usually believe in miracles - BUT. My daughter burnt herself badly when using a cafetiere. She applied manuka honey for several days and the hospital staff were amazed that her severe burns healed so quickly. she since swears by it, and the doctors confirmed that there are many such cases.

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No not just for external use. For some folk with internal wounds and/or infections like with Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis, Hiatus Hernia and recent surgery on the stomach or gut you need to eat the stuff. It does not taste that bad and needs to be at least UMF(Unique Manuka Factor)15+ for the problems listed above or so one is told by those that have benefited from it. As far as I am concerned time will tell.........JR
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[quote user="teapot"]

 now its a super food with antiseptic properties and dare I say it, tasted lie it to.

[/quote]

All honey has antiseptic properties, it's nothing to do with honey as such but from the sugar.

It is now a standard practise in hospitals to treat infected wounds, that do not respond to usual procedures, with a sterile sugar paste (just like fondant icing) which reduces the infection and allows the wound to heal.

I've also seen survival strategies where if you are say in a jungle and get a bad cut, pack it with sugar (even honey) to prevent infection.

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I think the point about Manuka honey, if and I say if you can believe the published information, is that the bees in NZ that produce the honey live on the Manuka or Tee Tree which has well known antiseptic properties. Elements of this are supposed to be incorporated into the honey. Now it is true that ordinary honey, because of the sugar content and as used by native people like the South American Indians for centuries applied directly to external wounds, has antiseptic and therefore healing properties. However Manuka honey when taken internally in such small quantities, like three teaspoonfuls a day and therefore much diluted, must have some additional property that ordinary honey does not have if it indeed helps internal infection and/ or inflammation to heal. I feel that the jury is still out on that one though others seem to be already convinced.

As there  is no "cure" for certain internal problems as yet then there is little to be lost in trying a "natural" palliative treatment that would appear not to have bad side effects as so many of the conventional treatments do. Steroids spring to mind when I say this. Time will tell!.............

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When I was a kid 40+ years ago, I ran down a mound of soil stopping when the palm of my hand hit the wall in front of me. Unfortunately a rusty nail went through my hand. A few days later as it was going a strange shade of green I showed my aunt she put a mound of sugar on the wound followed by a slice of green fairy soap (remember those bars) got a large plaster to cover the lot and within a fews days the would was clean and virtuall healed - nothing like good old fashioned housewives remedies ! CG
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 Nothing wrong with some good old fashioned  remedies. Penicillin and Asprin started out that way. Some remedies are a bit weird however, if not downright dangerous. Like hangover cures: Rabbit dropping tea, fried canaries, pickled sheep's eyes. Or the following cure for lockjaw. One made a tea with ground up insects and other bugs, cockroaches for preference, and then drank it!..................................JR
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I think it sounds brilliant. Natural remedies, when they work, have much to recommend them, and you can't get much more natural than honey. Tea tree oil has particular and useful properties, though for external use only, so why should honey made from the same plants not share those properties? If it does you good, then use it, and sod the expense. You can probably get it sent from England, people can pick it up for you, or you could even do a quick trip there yourself if you don't want to, or cannot, buy it in France.

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[quote user="odile"]Daughter numero uno just confirmed that the Manuka honey used for burns is medicinal strengh, not just normal 'eating' type.
[/quote]

Is that what I had on my porridge and toast? [+o(]

Tea tree, that does explain the taste.

Tea made from crushed beetles etc, it's either British rail or I am a celebrity get me out of here. [:)]

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Well yes I would draw the line at crushed  cockroach tea however the Manuka seems to be doing good things for my hiatus hernia. No symptoms for the last three weeks and it was bl***y awful before I started the honey. I will report back in a month or so on its effects or otherwise on the Crohn's if anyone is interested, beats taking Prednisone steroids which are really evil for some..........JR 
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The other half has been learning bee-keeping for the past few years - well, you never stop learning.

I've learnt just how good honey is - yes, it is a great poltice and was used as such in the medieval days, and if you can get lavender honey, that too is ideal for spreading on burns (I mentioned in another thread to Twinkle about the properties of lavender). I do a bit of aromatherapy and natural healing - look out for products called 'Burts Bees' - a whole range of products, I think they're on the web.

We are hoping when we finally get over to France, Chris will continue with his bee-keeping. This year has been disasterous for honey levels - many supplies from Uk bee keepers will be gone some time after Christmas. We have a small stockpile, but even ours is running low.

 

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Well if you could produce Manuka honey you would make a fortune, don't think Tee Trees would grow in France mores the pity, or would they? Aromatherapy seems impossible to get in France or at least it is around here. The wife used to swear by it in the UK.  Good luck with the bee keeping, lots round here judging by the nests we get in the chimney!.............JR
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