Jump to content
Complete France Forum

La Journée du Sommeil


NormanH

Recommended Posts

They were talking about somnambule on F2 Journal de 8 heures on Thursday night. What a wonderful word 'somnambule' is, most people fortunately grow out of it, but I know a few who haven't.

I really do feel for those with sleep disorders.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OSAS (Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome) is more common than many realise, typically an overweight, middle aged, male snorer, (not always, nor me I hasten add, though I have witnessed it[:)]) symptoms, are that breathing stops for short spells when asleep, relaxed throat muscles cause an obstruction to the airflow in the throat lasting for periods of 10-20 seconds. General measures are to lose weight and stop drinking alcohol 6hrs before bed . . .  easy to say[:D]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="just john "]

forgot to mention the important bit, that you should notify DVLA when diagnosed and not drive . . .

[/quote]

Unless treatment is given, I understand. My DIL's mother was diagnosed recently after having been monitored overnight, and was told by the consultant to lose weight and was given a mask to use at night. He told her that she could continue to drive her car and motorbike, and did not need to inform the DVLA provided she used the mask and went on a diet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="just john "]

forgot to mention the important bit, that you should notify DVLA when diagnosed and not drive . . .

[/quote]

Normally one has sleep apnoea when one is asleep, so driving shouldn't be a problem unless one usually drives while asleep[:-))] Narcolepsie, on the other hand...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Contrary to popular belief, OSA is not caused by being overweight. It's basically to do with breathing during sleep being obstructed by collapsible walls of soft tissue in the airway. Obesity can lead to low muscle tone which brings this about, so the condition is not uncommon in overweight people, but there are many other causes of obstructed airways.

I'm glad to see it receiving more recognition in France.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="Gemonimo"][quote user="just john "]

forgot to mention the important bit, that you should notify DVLA when diagnosed and not drive . . .

[/quote]

Normally one has sleep apnoea when one is asleep, so driving shouldn't be a problem unless one usually drives while asleep[:-))] Narcolepsie, on the other hand...........

[/quote]

In fact it is the effect of having had seriously disturbed sleep that causes people to fall asleep at the wheel, often for a micro second.

It is a major factor in motor way accidents.

The chap in the programme was alerted to his problem by just such an incident.

It has been widely known and treated in France for at least 10 years, as the centre in the report shows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a sleep apnae centre at the hospital in East Grinstead, my portly sister was a patient there; she now sleeps with an oxygen mask and said that she hadnt felt so well in years.

She also said that sadly she would not be able to visit me in France due to the impossibility of bringing her oxygen cylinder with her, she was quick to rebute my offer of my 15 litre breathing air diving cylinder saying that it wouldnt do, she does however now manage to holiday in the Carribean each year without medical assistance, I will tease her with the DVLA bit and see how she reacts.

This thread is quite timely as a group of us went to Bruxelles last night to do a night dive at the Nemo 35 metre diving fosse, it is such a warm (water at 33 degrees) and relaxing experience, for me anyway, a complete non sensory experience akin to returning to the womb that I suspected the last time that I had fallen asleep during the decompression stop, being brought to my senses by the bell signalling the end of the 50 minute session.

This time I decided to purposely try and take a nap to see if it was possible, I was beside the porthole looking out over the bar, a bit like a goldfish in a tank, I was lying slightly inclined rotated a little to the right with only my right heel in contact with the 10 metre ledge, my breathing was shallow and each inhilation/expiration would cause my body to rise and rotate about my point of contact, it was like a cradle rocking and did indeed send me to sleep for about 10 minutes. 

What I didnt know was that I must have either sleep apnae or at least stop breathing for periods when relaxed and that there was an infra red video camera behind the viewing window whose image was projected onto a large screen for the amusement of the viewers in the restaurant,  by all accounts initially they were amused, then became bored with not being able to see the more interesting antics behind me (a Smart car minus engine is tethered there) then became concerned when bubbles ceased to rise from my regulator and the lifeguard was despatched to save me [:$]

The journey home highlighted to me the benefits of proper relaxing sleep and made me more sympathetic to sleep apnae sufferers, my sleep pattern has been disturbed this week by taking a 3am ferry and then trying to sleep in a freezing cold bed at 8am, we were 7 crammed in the vehicle for the 2 hour journey to Bruxelles and I was getting a little bit tetchy, some of the others were beginning to get to me (although I hope I didnt let it show) they were raling continuously about inane things and could not speak for more than a few seconds without punctuating with the awfull euuuuhhh........, my bête noir, I was so tetchy that I started timing the one who was speaking the most, it was on average every one to two seconds I kid you not. On the return journey I was so zen that it didnt get to me in the slightest [:D]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're back to you buying an electric blanket or two next time you are in the UK. Think it'll be a good idea for your trips next winter, even if you don't need them for this winter.

.............or a hot lady to keep your bed warm?[:)]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although I don't suffer from a sleep deprivation condition, for the last few months I've not been sleeping well due to arthritis in my knees. At night my knees ache, waking me up. I can't easily straighten them and am currently using a small pillow to cushion them.

It's awful not sleeping well, and I feel heartily sorry for insomniacs and people who have other sleep problems.

I hope that my sleep will improve with treatment for my knees, because it's pretty miserable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sleeping and being in pain must be rotten.

The weird thing about sleep apnoea is that you don't actually know that you haven't slept well, as you don't consciously wake up.

The choking that happens when the throat closes over starts to lower the level of oxygen in the blood, so the brain reacts by waking you from the deep level of sleep you should be in to shock you into starting to breath again.

Somebody in the same room might notice you stop breathing for some time...a minute even, then restart with a sudden yawning gulp.

You don't actually wake up though, but as this can happen 60 times in a night you are never getting the sort of sleep needed to repair the damage from the day.

The result is that you can wake up still tired after apparently having slept all night , and easily fall asleep in front of the TV, computer, or worst of all driving.

Autoroutes Sud de France reckon that sleepiness is involved in at least 25% of accidents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="NormanH"]

Autoroutes Sud de France reckon that sleepiness is involved in at least 25% of accidents.

[/quote]

I used to be surprised by statistics like that, Norman, but I now know they are very probably correct.

The only accident I've had for 30+ years (and the only one down to me before that was very minor and caused by a sneeze, due to what was diagnosed as rhinitis - causing me to fracture ribs) was due to lack of sleep. I was driving down the inside lane on the autoroute returning from England, having had a very bad couple of nights and scraped right along the central barrier. My husband had dropped off, and I obviously did too, although I hadn't felt at all sleepy. No other car was involved, in fact no other cars were visible anywhere, which probably added to my sleepy state, and conditions on the road were good. We were shaken but fine (and very lucky!), although there was a lot of damage to the car. Both doors and both bumpers had to be replaced, costing several thousands of pounds, although we left it for a few months until we were back in England.

The insurance company, SAGA, was impressive, just noted the details when my husband phoned them, told us to let them have 2 quotes when we were ready, but we could choose any company - it didn't have to be the cheapest; we chose one further from home, but very efficient.

I don't have sleep apnoea, but haven't slept regular hours for a number

of years, despite all the very good advice and various herbal remedies

and prescribed sleeping tablets. The worst time has been when I managed

maybe 3 hours of sleep in 24 hours for months on end. Some of you might remember we had a thread about

it at one time.

I was prescribed a much stronger painkiller a few months ago for my back, and was warned it's very addictive, so didn't take it

until a few weeks ago - and the relief from pain was enormous! I only

took them for a few days at the minimum dose mentioned and then stopped.

Not only have I had much less pain since then, but I've been sleeping

better - occasionally up to an amazing 7 hours! They seem to have bumped me into different and much better sleeping patterns.

I haven't driven that car since then, but will no doubt get used to it again. I rather think I'd prefer my husband to stay awake then, even though I'm sleeping better now.

I sympathise with Frecossais; hope things do improve for you - I also have painful arthritis, and can appreciate your problems with that and sleepping badly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hence the medical advice to notify DVLA and not drive until after treatment, (though no licence is required for disabled scooters as far as I'm aware, so presumably no need to notify DVLA in that instance, but I always give scooters a wide berth just in case[:D])
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...