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Colonoscopy Query


stan

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Having about to undergo the joys of a colonocscopy tomorrow, I was curious to know the experiences of others who have undergone procedures which are basically hald day admissions with general anaesthetic/sedation. I was wondering if a spouse is allowed to remain within your "day/half day" room whilst you are away having this procedure done, or whether there are generally public waiting rooms.

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My two experiences in the UK are that there is a public waiting room and the procedure is conducted in a treatment room with about 4 staff, I chose not to have anaesthetic/sedation, (which the staff seemed to prefer that you don't) and though slightly uncomfortable ([:-))]) meant I was able to drive home. By far the worse part is the guk of the previous 24hrs to the hilarious amusement of those around me!

In every job that must be done, there is an element of fun,
find the fun and you'll agree, it's as easy as can be!

Good Luck[:)]

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Thanks JustJohn and Cendrillon.

I know the procedure in the UK, but here in France where patients can opt to have a relative even stay with them overnight etc and colonoscopies are done under a general anaesthetic (unlike the UK as a matter of course). I was just wondering if my wife can stay in my room whilst I am away having the procedure done.

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My husband had this done and I could, if I wished, wait in his room as it was a day procedure. However, as he had some polyps removed the hospital advised that he should stay in overnight so I went home to collect him the next day. Often, of course, there are cafes and places where relatives can wait ... but Mr. Nectarine had a general anaesthetic in the morning and was sitting up in bed chatting to me in the afternoon. By the way, he says not to worry, it's painless and easy.
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I had one done recently, does it really matter where your wife waits, room or visitors lounge? The procedure is fairly quick and even with the anesthesia and réanimation the maximum wait would only be an hour, I know that I was awake and back in my room in an hour, the visitors lounge may well be closer to the salle de réanimation.

The only time that a patients conjoint would be asked to leave the private room would be just before the discharge when they would want to clean and disinfect it en profondeur ready for the next patient.

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Stan, I have just had a colonoscopy about 10 days ago (second time here in France). By far the worst is the preparation, which you have to adhere to very strictly for 3 days before the procedure itself. It is usually done under general anaesthetic by a gastro-enterologue,  as the exploration involves the entire length of the colon, right up to the ileo-caecal valve on the right of your lower abdomen.

The prep involves a strict "sans résidue" diet which is horrid if you like veg and fruit etc... but it's only for 3 days. And the worst is the purging regimen, as it involves drinking 2 liters of water with some powder diluted in them, makes you feel pregnant and a little nauseous, and it does mean that you have to spend the evening before the procedure at home, mostly sitting on the toilet!

You usually have a brief appointment with an anesthesist who can answer your queries about a general. It is a very light anaesthesia, the colonoscopy itself lasts about 15 minutes.

I live locally so I arrived in a 2-bed room at 12 midday, the other patient had already gone to theatre, and she had a lady sitting by the empty bed, who had evidently accompanied her. I was the last patient to go through that procedure on that day - undressed, a gown on, lying on a trolley I was wheeled in the recovery room right by theatre. Next to me was another patient who was still sedated, she had just come out. Between us was a loudspeaker, with FUN MUSIC radio playing quite loud. I understood why: the procedure involves pumping air in your colon so as to make the walls perfectly separate and visible, just like you would blow the inner tube of a bicycle (!). Once it is over, some of the air is still around...and as the patient wakes up, you are told to evacuate it - and some people are a little self-conscious about farting in public I guess, hence Fun Radio full blast (heavy bass too usually.[:D] ).

Eventually I was wheeled in at about 1.00 pm (had had a catheter put into my hand, painless) - the anaesthesist came over, fiddled with it for a second...and next thing I knew, I was still in theatre, everyone gone home except the nurse clearing it who kindly said to take my time waking up. I felt absolutely fine, no sequels at all. Wheeled back to my room, waited for the doc to come around and to tell me results (all OK), and I was collected at 3pm - strict instructions that someone should collect you and that you do not drive even if you feel OK - just in case the anaesthetic does strange things to you.

So, altogether, only 3 hours in the clinic. All done very efficiently, painlessly, competently, and all the medical personnel was really kind and considerate. Good luck, you should be just fine!

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Two differences for me 5E, they put me on that very strict regime (no fruit, veg or fibre) for 5 months........ the consultant denied all knowledge later, (in spite of me having it in writing from her)....... I didn't lose a gram, and was becoming very ill.

And the other thing was that I had to have a shower with the red bottle iodine when I got to the hospital.

 

During me and family's time in the hospital I didn't see anyone staying with anybody at all. There was certainly no room in any of the rooms I was in or my family have been in for anyone else to stay for more than a short visit. Frankly, I am happy alone in such circumstances.

 

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Thanks to everyone for taking the time to write down their experiences...just had my 4pm last snack...then 7.30pm laxatives. Not expecting anything to be found tomorrow as I am only having it done due to my father being recently diagnosed with colon cancer and it is hereditary. Will update tomorrow after the event...thanks again.

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Good luck stan. You are wise to have it as there is a family tendency towards the problem

I have this done every couple of years, and it did turn something up, but I have been operated on, and the most recent one was ok with only a couple of small benign polyps.

If by any unfortunate mischance you have a worry after the test don't hesitate to ask for more info..

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Eddie's paternal grandfather died of colon cancer, and he's had a few colonscopies, in the UK and here. He had a few polyps removed, but nothing cancerous up to now. It's well worth having it done, especially if it's in the family. The preparation is difficult but the test itself no problems. I drop him off at the clinic, and could  wait but decided to go home and come back.

I had one in the UK back in the 90s, as part of a random survey. They sent me an enema pack in the post which I had to self-administer the morning of the test. Then go to the hospital. We didn't have a car at the time so I went on the bus [:'(]

There was no anaesthetic, and it was very uncomfortable, but I was glad I'd agreed to do it, puts your mind at rest. They didn't find anything.

The stool tests are supposed too be better than nothing, but not infallible. (I was reading an article about it yesterday, some recent research.)

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Just back from the hospital..all done within 4 hours from time entering clinic to leaving. The procedure itself was quick, 20 minutes asleep, then back to room for coffee and muffins. Although I was not expecting anything to be found as it was purely to be preventative, they actually found 4 small polyps which they removed. They appear benign but will get results in few days. All in all a pain free experience and absolutely no sensation of anything uncomfortable afterwards. Well done to the French health service!

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Do they always do an analysis of the polyps removed?

My colorectologist said he removed and cauterised one but everything was OK, he could have said 100 and i would have been no more the wiser, a bit like in the old days a mechanic saying while we had your engine apart I found you needed a decoke and the valve seats recut, here is your bill [:-))]

If they are systematically analysed I will ask for the results just to be sure, in the UK an urgent message from the hospital to the surgery for me to return ASAP was decided to be not worthy of passing on to me.

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Very wise Chancer. They do a histological analysis at the lab of what has been taken, and I have usually had an extra bill a bit later for that as it isn't included in the charge the clinic makes.

On the other hand the surgeon usually has a pretty good idea, and if it was really tiny might not have bothered.

The polyp I had which was cancerous wasn't picked up by the specialist till I went to see him a year later to make another appointment and he said 'ooops there was something there that certainly needs looking at'...

I don't think could have even looked at the results, because they were quite clear...

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  • 1 year later...
As Norman once wrote, there's no "NHS" in France. All GPs and specialists are self-employed.

Those that do colonoscopies are called Medecins gastro-enterologistes et hépatologistes . Look them up in you Pages jaunes.

But again ref. Norman, your GP will refer you to your nearest.

I could be wrong on some points.

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I don't think that's correct Clark. Some are, not all; And NHS work is paid to the GPs by the NHS.

In France it's the different caisses that pay the doctors, and the mutualistes. Otherwise the patient pays, and he's already paid into his caisse and mutuelle anyway.

I'm not sure of all this, hope someone more knowledgable comes along. (A separate topic maybe?)

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GP group practices are partnerships. Individual GPs (eg Harold Shipman) are sole traders.

GPs receive capitation payments from the NHS (which in reality is an accounting system) in respect of patients registered with them. GPs are not employed by the NHS but are contractors. GPs can - and do - accept private patients, too.

 

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