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Advice - Electric Convector Type Heaters


UlsterRugby1999

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While still studying the air-to-air systems for chez moi for next winter, I'm looking at keeping the kitchen with its existing wood burner and a smallish electric heater that will thermostatically kick in in the mornings until we get the fire up and running.

In the BricoDepot bible I see there are 1.5kw Convecteur Mecanique units at 32,80€ while there is a fine and dandy looking Panneau Rayonnant unit at 134€. I'm sure the answer is obvious but what is the difference[8-)]

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Convecteurs are very simple things they singe the air and it rises eventually forming a convection current warming the air in the room. Has a drying effect on the air but is quite effective at taking the edge off large cold spaces.

 

The rayonant serves radiant heat which warms objects that it touches, more pleasant to be in.

 

John

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Some five years ago rayonnants became all the rage, in principle black body radiation which heats YOU directly without warming the air in between; more efficient and probably a plausible proposition for a new house constructed from placoplatre IMHO this is not a good idea for traditional peasant houses as the convection of warm air particularly near the solid stone walls where radiateurs à convection tend to lurk assists the evaporation of any moisture which may accumulate on the walls. At the time I originally made this enlightened appraisal of the mutual needs of moi et ma maison, the french population were busy throwing out there convecteurs. I popped over to the Emmaûs at Cholet and bought some super radiateurs with thermostats at if I remember correctly € 3 per unit.

PS If you wait to sales on wednesday you will almost certainly find some at half price as the rayonnant mantra still holds strong.
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Hey - no worries Big Mac I found it funny. I asked the question and got a correct answer. [;-)]

Anyway, what I was really getting at was to try and find out which would be better. I had assumed that the 101,20€ more expensive machine would be more efficient, use less electricity than its cheaper counterpart. All this talk of convected this and radiant that - well me is confudled.

At the moment there are the cheaper convecter radiators in the house. The kitchen will have 1 unit to kick in in the cold mornings (much like this morning - it's showing -7C right now) until we get the fire lit. Will one be more efficient and cost effective than the other.

Over to you Big Mac [kiss][;-)][:P][kiss]

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[quote user="UlsterRugby1999"]

Hey - no worries Big Mac I found it funny. I asked the question and got a correct answer. [;-)]

Anyway, what I was really getting at was to try and find out which would be better. I had assumed that the 101,20€ more expensive machine would be more efficient, use less electricity than its cheaper counterpart. All this talk of convected this and radiant that - well me is confudled.

At the moment there are the cheaper convecter radiators in the house. The kitchen will have 1 unit to kick in in the cold mornings (much like this morning - it's showing -7C right now) until we get the fire lit. Will one be more efficient and cost effective than the other.

Over to you Big Mac [kiss][;-)][:P][kiss]

[/quote]

I suspect that moving the thermometer nearer the heat source or maybe keeping it in your pocket will show a marked increase in temperature readings......Dunno how big the kitchen is but a couple of oil filled rads on timer could possibly allow you to make use of cheap overnight electric and take the edge off the cold. It's been said before but the secret is to be well insulated rather than spending a fortune on heat which is being lost. -7 Brrrrrrrrr

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Just for info.

We have a cheap convector (circa euro 19 at Castorama) that has 3 settings, 800 / 1200 / 2000w. Plus a thermostat. It is on in the bathroom 24 hrs a day at the 800w range with the stat at mid point. I have no idea of the actual consumption, nor of the room temperature as I never measured it. Suffice to say the room is a comfortable temperature such that a shower is not any ordeal, even with an ambient outside temp of minus quite a bit.

My CH design calculations indicate a heat requirement of about 350w against a design temp of 20 C and an outside ambient of -1 C. I am guessing that the actual temperature is below 20 C and hence I am possibly using 300w (say). this translates to 7.2units per day which is a cost of about 0.8 euros or 5.6 euro per week.

My calculation above may be totally wrong but even doubling it to 11 euro per week I dont consider it to be a bad price for a warm bathroom.

I suspect that a couple of hours per day with a convector in a kitchen (on a time switch) would not cost more than 10 euro per week.

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Mmmmmmmmmm - all good feedback - as usual (oh and good maths too of course).

I'm planning to have this all in place for the next winter but I can see me getting some of it organised sooner rather than later. Even with 3 wood burners, two of them running 24/7, this Baltic is hammering the hell out of our ever decreasing wood pile. We've just had to order 2 more cords. That'll be 8 in total by the end of the winter - God willing it doesnt last too long.

Thanks folks for the input [:D][:D] 

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