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Radiators


woolybanana

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Woolly:

You must carefully consider the weight of any rad filled with water; far heavier than one might think.

Wall mounting brackets work simply by relying on the sheer loading of the mounting screws into a decent solid wall.

Even such as a size 10 wood screw can take an enormous load in sheer.

With a conventional pressed steel rad the problem is going to be where do you attach the floor mounting?

Would probably need welding onto the bottom finishing lug (The bit where the two pressed sides come together and are welded: like a fin).

If I was doing this then I would probably silicon-bronze braze, rather than weld.

Welding brackets then needs an absolute guarantee that all welds are free of pinholes: or they will leak: quite badly since they are under pressure.

Why can't you/don't you want to wall-mount

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[quote user="Gluestick"]Woolly:

You must carefully consider the weight of any rad filled with water; far heavier than one might think.

Wall mounting brackets work simply by relying on the sheer loading of the mounting screws into a decent solid wall.

Even such as a size 10 wood screw can take an enormous load in sheer.

With a conventional pressed steel rad the problem is going to be where do you attach the floor mounting?

Would probably need welding onto the bottom finishing lug (The bit where the two pressed sides come together and are welded: like a fin).

If I was doing this then I would probably silicon-bronze braze, rather than weld.

Welding brackets then needs an absolute guarantee that all welds are free of pinholes: or they will leak: quite badly since they are under pressure.

Why can't you/don't you want to wall-mount

[/quote]

Pedant that I am....I believe you mean SHEAR load GS
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I believe you are then stuck with a bathroom type which can be floor mounted, Woolly.

However, they do have wall brackets for lateral support.

Unless you go for an ally casting with floor mounts.

Personally, if I was concerned about the integrity of a dry wall lining, then I would insert two upright 2X1 type battens to take out the load.

They would be fundamentally hidden behind the rad.

Did this in our Victorian/Edwardian flat which has lath and plaster walls in which you can see the goat or horsehair in the plaster!

Hasn't fallen down yet....................................

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  • 1 month later...
Thinking of plumbing fittings, when did "standardisation" of pipe diameters, threads etc come in? I've got my eye on some rads which have been removed from a 50's (?) apartment and am assuming that I can "bodge" them into a modern system somehow. Am I right?
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[quote user="Gluestick"]Woolly:

You must carefully consider the weight of any rad filled with water; far heavier than one might think.

[/quote]

I suppose it depends on the radiator, but flat panel radiators are designed to heat up quickly and don't contain much water. I couldn't find much by way of facts and figures, except this from a US website:

For example, a typical fluted-steel panel radiator 24 inches high by 72 inches long by 4 inches thick

contains about 2.1 gallons of water and has an empty weight of about 127 pounds.

That's quite a big radiator, and the water in it (converting US gallons to litres) weighs about 8kg. By contrast, the empty radiator weighs nearly 60kg.

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[quote user="JohnM"]Thinking of plumbing fittings, when did "standardisation" of pipe diameters, threads etc come in? I've got my eye on some rads which have been removed from a 50's (?) apartment and am assuming that I can "bodge" them into a modern system somehow. Am I right?[/quote]

John

I think you probably can, as I understand that radiator fittings are old-fashioned pipe threads, in imperial sizes, and these are the same now as they were in the 1950s.

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