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QUESTION REGARDING FRENCH RESIDENT PERMITS


Moffers
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Hi All

I have just signed up on this site and wondered if anyone could help me with a query regarding residents permits.  My husband and I are UK residents who wish to retire in France.  We will both officially be UK state pensioners when we apply.  I understand that there are lots of different visas and residents permits available and I think we would initially need a VLS-T (Visiteur.)  My question is that when the VLS-T nears expiration, what options for residents permits are available to us?  As we will initially be renting a property in France and selling our property in the UK to become cash buyers, are we eligible to apply for a Carte de Sejour pluriannuelle, or Carte de Resident de 10 ans once the VLS-T is due to expire, or would we have to keep renewing on an annual basis for 3-5 years before qualifying for a longer residents permit?  Having to renew annually for years on end, with no guarantee of acceptance sounds a little risky to us.  We've tried various official bodies for an answer, but just keep getting the runaround.  Any enlightenment you are able to give would be much appreciated.

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I think most of us that are residents moved well before Brexit so our understanding of the new visa systems might be limited but by doing a bit of research I can confirm that a Visiteur visa would not entitle you to apply for either a Carte de Sejour pluriannuelle or Carte de Resident 10 ans.

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Do not apply for a VLS-T as that is not renewable, and will expire on the end date of the visa.

You should apply for a VLS-TS Visitor visa. Ensure that you apply for more than 12 months, which you validate on arrival in France, and this then becomes you (virtual) Carte De Sejour. You will then have to apply after the first year for a renewal of your Carte De Sejour, and once granted you will get a physical card. You have to renew annually for the first five years. After five years you renew and will be granted a permanent residence.

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1 hour ago, crabtree said:

After five years you renew and will be granted a permanent residence.

I think you have to apply for permanent residence. It isn't automatic. Also, if you're going to apply you have to remember that during the qualifying five years you cannot leave France for a consecutive period exceeding six months and, in total, you cannot spend more than ten months out of the country.

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1 hour ago, DaveLister said:

I think you have to apply for permanent residence. It isn't automatic. Also, if you're going to apply you have to remember that during the qualifying five years you cannot leave France for a consecutive period exceeding six months and, in total, you cannot spend more than ten months out of the country.

The renewal after 5 years becomes permanent residence. Of course it is down to the individual to apply (every year for the first 5 for that matter).

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14 hours ago, DaveLister said:

Welcome back ALBF. Did you have a good holiday?

It was fantastic. Depressingly fantastic.

Two days in London and four days in Soctland with the Caladonian sleeper in between.

The West highlands were marvelous as usual. But the best was Edinburgh. Never been before. What a truly beautiful and fantastic city. We loved it and OH and the frogey kids felt soo at home there. People were so nice, funny, happy (despite the rain….which I liked)and smiling and the food was far better than anything you would get in France.

Bodes well with this thread, move to Edinburgh and go through all the hassle of visa’s for OH….or spend our dosh just on holidays to Scotland and live here being bored out of our minds.

Five minutes of leaving Poitiers airport on our return we were nearly murdered by an arsõle in a car. 

The culture shock of coming back to France is becoming too much as I grow older. 

Somthing to think about when thinking about retirement.

 

Edited by alittlebitfrench
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Thank you so much all who have given me the information I needed, although it's not the answer I was hoping for.  Moving to France is something we decided upon over 20 years ago, following our first holiday there, but circumstances have prevented us from doing so until now.  We were hoping that we could get a 4-5 year resident permit after the first year or two, but it would appear that we would have to wait 5 years to get that extra security, renewing annually until then.  Looks like we may have to retire in the UK after all.  😞

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16 hours ago, alittlebitfrench said:

"But please really think twice before retiring to France. I personally would not retire to France today. In the 1990’s ok….today……noooo.   Save your dosh and spend it on holidays if France is your thing is my advice."

Many thanks for your thoughts alittlebitfrench, but is France really any worse than the UK at present?  We have been intent upon moving to France for over 20 years now, holidaying there every year since 2000 (apart from the years restricted by Covid), but life circumstances have prevented us from doing so until now.  We cannot afford to have a property in both countries, so we would have to sell our UK property and purchase one in France.  It would be all or nothing for us.  However, in light of the information given regarding residents permits, it looks as if we will have to stay here instead.  😞

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Moffers said:

Thank you so much all who have given me the information I needed, although it's not the answer I was hoping for.  Moving to France is something we decided upon over 20 years ago, following our first holiday there, but circumstances have prevented us from doing so until now.  We were hoping that we could get a 4-5 year resident permit after the first year or two, but it would appear that we would have to wait 5 years to get that extra security, renewing annually until then.  Looks like we may have to retire in the UK after all.  😞

Once you get the initial visa as a visitor, (which is what foreign retirees get), renewals are usually fairly straightforward provided you supply any documents requested. It is fairly unusual for subsequent compliant renewals to not be granted.

Don't give up, many Brits have been getting succesful yearly renewals since Brexit.

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5 hours ago, Moffers said:

 

Is France worse than the UK ?

Dunno..have not lived in the UK for 25 years.

France is politically and economically in a dire situation. It is also very dangerous place. 

It is also a very expensive country to live in.

Through in climate change which makes life a very big challenge in the summer and other months. It far too hot here.

I personally think the UK (for all its troubles) is a safer bet than France to be honest.

A question I often ask myself is would I retire to France ?

The answer is no. I would not.

We will move eventually for all the reasons given above.

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Moffers, you need to make up your own mind.  Can you come for say 3 months, rent a place and try it out?  Come with an open mind and lots and lots of questions.  The answers you get do depend on the questions you ask!

As you have been thinking of this project for so long, you will have a good idea of what it is that attracts you here.  As with all else in life, there are no guarantees, whatever you decide.  Therefore it will be just a matter both of thought, instinct, feeling, etc.

For a start, balance out the information you get.  Check out as far as possible the accuracy of what is told you and that includes the replies you get here, including mine!

If I were you, I'd feel this is worth a lot more thought and investigation. 

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Moffers, that all sounds a lovely plan, and you have had loads of excellent advice.

One more thing that is worth thinking about is whether you can afford to keep a property in the UK to move back to if your circumstances change.  Property prices rise much faster in the UK than in France, and it can be very difficult to get back into it once you move somewhere where properties are enticingly cheaper.

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22 hours ago, alittlebitfrench said:

the food was far better than anything you would get in France.

True, we really miss deep fried Mars Bars, jock pies, (both normal and deluxe)  all washed down with copious quantities of Iron bru - 

Aw, deep-fried Mars,
ah spied ye oan the menu
o ma local chippie.
A speshialtie o Caledonia,
wee, fudgie, chocolate, caramel bar,
ma hert’s desire,
bung fu o calories,
cholesterol choked,
cannae whack ye,
a cracker, a stoater.
Unwrapped, in the scud,
belly-flopped in batter
an frazzled tae perfection.

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When I lived in the UK we used to have the most amazing food delivered from Scotland. Loch Fyne kippers, arbroath smokies, caledonian cheeses, fantastic back bacon and oatcakes. Their shellfish was brilliant too. I always thought that, if I ever got to visit, I wouldn't starve.

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On 03/11/2023 at 09:56, alittlebitfrench said:

It was fantastic. Depressingly fantastic.

Two days in London and four days in Soctland with the Caladonian sleeper in between.

The West highlands were marvelous as usual. But the best was Edinburgh. Never been before. What a truly beautiful and fantastic city. We loved it and OH and the frogey kids felt soo at home there. People were so nice, funny, happy (despite the rain….which I liked)and smiling and the food was far better than anything you would get in France.

Bodes well with this thread, move to Edinburgh and go through all the hassle of visa’s for OH….or spend our dosh just on holidays to Scotland and live here being bored out of our minds.

Five minutes of leaving Poitiers airport on our return we were nearly murdered by an arsõle in a car. 

The culture shock of coming back to France is becoming too much as I grow older. 

Somthing to think about when thinking about retirement.

 

Far better than ANYTHING you would get in France?  Really?

ALBF, when are you going to learn not to make sweeping statements and, if you do have a contrary point to make, to do it in a sensible, logical manner?

So ALL food in Scotland is "far better" than ALL food in France?  Well, that is what your statement is saying.  Do you stand by it?  Can you give any actual examples, any credible research, any statistics to back you up?

Or are you just being utterly ridiculous and not for the first time?

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1 hour ago, menthe said:

Far better than ANYTHING you would get in France?  Really?

ALBF, when are you going to learn not to make sweeping statements and, if you do have a contrary point to make, to do it in a sensible, logical manner?

So ALL food in Scotland is "far better" than ALL food in France?  Well, that is what your statement is saying.  Do you stand by it?  Can you give any actual examples, any credible research, any statistics to back you up?

Or are you just being utterly ridiculous and not for the first time?

Ooh Minty.

We went to a little little cafe in Kyle lochalsh and ordered some sandwiches and a burger for the kids….a pickle toasty and other stuff.

The price, the size of the portions was beyond anything I have seen in in France. And it was delicious. Even the side salad was meticulously made. It was art work.

I could go on….

France portrays itself as the culinary centre of the universe and peeps fall for it. Its not by a long long way.

Im not a foody person…so I will tell you like is.

 

 

 

 

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There is definite trend in France for resto's to serve reheated industrial food - precooked and reheated in a microwave etc.

There was an online newspaper article on the subject recently but I can't find it. 

But this is representitive and dates from 2011 !

"Of the 33 dishes on the menu of Jean-Luc Madec's restaurant in Guyancourt (78), 6 are of industrial origin

So many admissible arguments... until we look at the copious margins made thanks to industrial preparations. “On a dish with sauce which costs 2 or 3 euros per portion, it is common to multiply by 4 or 5 to put it at between 10 and 15 euros on the menu, and some do not hesitate to go even harder” , assures Yannick, a professional who has run several trendy establishments in the Oberkampf district, in Paris."

https://www.capital.fr/economie-politique/les-plats-industriels-envahissent-les-cuisines-des-restaurants-595930

Nothing wrong with doing that if it's made from proper ingredients and not full of preservatives.

 

Edited by Harnser
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