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New Car Petrol or Diesel ?


danny
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We noticed in our local newspaper that the price of second hand cars has shot up, so we dropped by our local Renault dealer today to get some information. 

We ended up with two quotes, one for a diesel and one for a petrol car.

We currently have a Renault Koleos 4x4 diesel 10cv manual gear change, which we bought in April 2018 for 36,000€. It has 34000km on the clock.

The quote for the same model diesel but with automatic gears is now 55,224€ which includes a new charge for a Malus ecolique of 5,105€. They are offering 31,300€ trade in value bringing the net cost down to 23,900€

The petrol quote, automatic gears with 8cv and is a 4x2, is 46,549€ and the trade in value is 30,700€ bringing the net cost to 15,800€.

With our current car we have used the 4x4 on one occasion in the mountains. About 85% of our motoring is short trips of about 30km each time.

Neither of us knows anything about cars other than how to drive them, we have never opened the bonnet on the current car.

We would appreciate some advice from the wise owls on the board as to what is the better option for us is.

An electric car would not be suitable as we live in a building of 12 apartments and the parking space in the garage has no electrical points. At the last AGM a proposal to install an electrical junction box was turned dowd as being to expensive.

 

Danny.

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The cost of second hand cars has increased considerably, not only here but other countries as well; notably the U.K. It's all to do with the scarcity of micro chips apparently. Many customers are complaining that the new cars they are buying don't have all the 'gizmos' they should have because of this problem. Hence the cost of second hand cars increasing because they do have all the 'gizmos'!!

Second hand cars have always been expensive in France, as is everything else I have found (second hand that is!) I have been used to second hand 'stuff' being mostly very cheap in the U.K. so when I look at second hand French prices I'm quite shocked. 

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There is nothing to stop an individual installing their own charging point in the garage area of a block of flats in France.  I am on our CS for the residence and we are going through the procedure for an someone who is doing that.  It has to be submitted to the Syndic or AG with the tech specs, cost and separate supply to the communal one for the building, with its own counter.  All this is at the charge of the person wanting the installation.   

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25 minutes ago, Lehaut said:

There is nothing to stop an individual installing their own charging point in the garage area of a block of flats in France.  I am on our CS for the residence and we are going through the procedure for an someone who is doing that.  It has to be submitted to the Syndic or AG with the tech specs, cost and separate supply to the communal one for the building, with its own counter.  All this is at the charge of the person wanting the installation.   

I don't know but, installing a charging point for oneself in a block of flats sounds very expensive. Given that electric cars are not cheap plus installing a  charging point I wonder if it is economical? Like many things, glazing, heat pumps, solar panels etc. the capitol outlay can never be recovered unless you are around 20 years of age to start with!!!

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Danny reports that their current car is only doing about 11000 km per year and that they have never lifted the bonnet in 3 years.

An electric car would suit the distance driven better than either a petrol or diesel model. But presumably you still need to top up the screenwash reservoir?

 

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Please do not buy a Renault.....ever....again. JUST DON'T. OK...enough said. 

The prices they are quoting you are stupid.....because they think they can get away with it. Given you no nothing about cars, they just might. Those prices are BMW prices. Go buy a BMW if you want to pay that money.

 

If not....and save some cash...

Have a look at the Skoda range. Mazda ???

We recently bought a new car (Mazda) and went petrol after driving (Sokda/VAG) diesels for a long time.

The Mazda marginally out performs our diesel car.

Diesels are not good for short distances. Not good at all for the engine of the car. The filters get blocked and all sorts. 

Personally I would go Mazda 'petrol' nearly new. Or Skoda. 

We bought our mazda (nearly new) from Belgium and it was delieverd FOC. Saved a fortune over buying in France.

 

Hope that helps. 

Edited by alittlebitfrench
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2 hours ago, Ken said:

I don't know but, installing a charging point for oneself in a block of flats sounds very expensive. Given that electric cars are not cheap plus installing a  charging point I wonder if it is economical? Like many things, glazing, heat pumps, solar panels etc. the capitol outlay can never be recovered unless you are around 20 years of age to start with!!!

You don't know, so why comment? That just adds an illogical bias based on absolutely nothing factual.

Capital outlay cant be recovered unless you are around 20? You really have no clue on the subject at all. 

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38 minutes ago, Harnser said:

Danny reports that their current car is only doing about 11000 km per year and that they have never lifted the bonnet in 3 years.

An electric car would suit the distance driven better than either a petrol or diesel model. But presumably you still need to top up the screenwash reservoir?

 

With the quoted mileage (km) charging at an off flat development public point occasionally would be easy if you cant get a point at the flats but they should address this point as they will soon anyway. Just look for charging points near to where you are living, travelling to, many shops have them now and the number is growing. You have to drive to go and get fuel now so not really any difference.

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3 hours ago, Teapot1 said:

You don't know, so why comment? That just adds an illogical bias based on absolutely nothing factual.

Capital outlay cant be recovered unless you are around 20? You really have no clue on the subject at all. 

Did you get out of bed the wrong side this morning or are you always rude? I said it sounds expensive, and to me it does. It isn't going to be cheap installing a private charger in a block of flats. As regards not having a clue. Only a dimwit would lay out a large capitol sum in the certain knowledge that, if they are of advanced years, they would never recuperate the outlay. A younger person might! Now, I suggest you go back to bed and start again!

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6 hours ago, Ken said:

Did you get out of bed the wrong side this morning or are you always rude? I said it sounds expensive, and to me it does. It isn't going to be cheap installing a private charger in a block of flats. As regards not having a clue. Only a dimwit would lay out a large capitol sum in the certain knowledge that, if they are of advanced years, they would never recuperate the outlay. A younger person might! Now, I suggest you go back to bed and start again!

10 hours ago, Harnser said:

Danny reports that their current car is only doing about 11000 km per year and that they have never lifted the bonnet in 3 years.

An electric car would suit the distance driven better than either a petrol or diesel model. But presumably you still need to top up the screenwash reservoir?

 

With the quoted mileage (km) charging at an off flat development public point occasionally would be easy if you cant get a point at the flats but they should address this point as they will soon anyway. Just look for charging points near to where you are living, travelling to, many shops have them now and the number is growing. You have to drive to go and get fuel now so not really any difference.

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Is it rude? Just correcting your inaccurate information. You clearly do not know about electric cars or renewables but will still avail us all with your thoughts based on? 

Why dont people shut up when they don't know what they are talking about? Could be a new topic.

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9 hours ago, Teapot1 said:

Is it rude? Just correcting your inaccurate information. You clearly do not know about electric cars or renewables but will still avail us all with your thoughts based on? 

Why dont people shut up when they don't know what they are talking about? Could be a new topic.

Indeed! Why don't they shut up when they don't know what they are talking about!! Economics isn't your strong point that's for sure!!

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I like the idea of buying an electric car even less when I see stories like THIS

I'm sure someone will leap to their defence and say it won't happen, but there are plenty of videos on line of similar events with cars.

I had the lead-acid battery explode in a new car I when I tried to start it, but fortunately the bonnet was closed, so there was just a dent where the cell which blew out hit the underside, and at least lead-acid batteries don't contain inflammable materials.

 

Edited by ssomon
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My wife used to drive a large Volvo 940 estate: which we purchased just after the French house as it was essential for moving stuff backwards and forwards. I used to drive my favourite BMW.

Now, my wife runs a Smart ForFour; fantastic little car! 1100 c.c. three cylinders, four doors, very economical to run. I now have a Peugeot 407 SW Estate, 2 litre diesel.

Electric car? Not for me as yet. A core problem they have just realised is that there are far too few electronics engineers who know how to fix them!

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 17/11/2021 at 06:44, AnOther said:

If you suffer from range anxiety......:classic_wacko:

Make sure it will fit in the boot though.

Be prepared.jpg

I love it 😄

New car - only petrol. The fuel consuming is similar. the diesel fuel system is very breakdown and expensive to repair. Proprietary, it cannot be repaired, only you have to buy new parts.

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"Diesel system prone to breaking down and expensive to repair, can't be repaired"? Being a diesel owner for over twenty years I don't Agree with that. Having a car serviced regularly as per the schedule by a competent garage is preventative maintenance. 

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3 hours ago, roganx87 said:

I love it 😄

New car - only petrol. The fuel consuming is similar. the diesel fuel system is very breakdown and expensive to repair. Proprietary, it cannot be repaired, only you have to buy new parts.

Eh?

A diesel injection system is very simple: actually, more simple than a petrol car. mainly because the diesel is what is called Compression Ignition whereas a petrol car needs regular sparks and the fuel and ignition systems are intertwined and controlled by a complex computer which uses what is called "Mapping".

Modern diesels are also mapped. The fuel pump and injectors are indeed proprietary (as are petrol injection systems), however nearly all parts are readily available and there are legions of specialists who rebuild pumps and injectors.

The most vulnerable component in a diesel is (If fitted) the Turbocharger. That said many performance petrol cars also use a turbo for more oomph. However, once again, many specialists these days who repair and recondition turbos.

Worth remembering, perhaps, that probably the most common Taxi in Africa and the Middle East was/is the Mercedes 200 diesel: and are expected, if correctly serviced to achieve 400,000 Km!

https://www.mercedes-benz.com/en/classic/history/michael-nickl-and-his-million-kilometres-in-the-mercedes-200-diesel-w124/

 

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Regular heavy towing excepted diesel has only ever made sense if you did the mileage to warrant the additional costs associated with buying and servicing.

The advantage of cheaper fuel is rapidly being eroded too.

I'd been a staunch diesel user for some 30 odd years but a few months ago replaced an ageing hack with a modern (for me!) 10 year old but under 100k km petrol Skoda Yeti which, whilst only having the 1.2lt TSi engine, it still packs 105hp (77kW) and 129ft-lb of torque which is more than sufficient for the social and domestic purposes which now dominate my driving habits.

Fuel consumption is averaging 41mpg and DIY servicing consists of no more than the scheduled 15,000km oil and filter changes and bi annual brake fluid replacement although I plan to do the oil changes at 10,000 which is what all I now typically cover in a year.

On an annualised basis then servicing is probably going to cost me around €60-70 or say €150 at a garage but that ain't going to happen whilst I'm still capable of swinging a spanner!

On this particular engine the timing chain, aux belt, and fuel filter are 'for life'.

No more DPF's and EGR cleaning and 'Italian tune ups' for MOT/ITV's for me!

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Not arguing the longevity of diesel, my previous MKI Skoda Octavia (1.9tdi) is still going strong at some 340,000 km without having had a single major component replaced, including the clutch.

Prior to that I had a MKIV Golf with the same engine and that went to a gnats shy of 400,000 miles before it was retired due to money needing spending on the suspension.

Neither burnt a drop of oil.

Not without some regret I sold the Octavia before leaving France and as a temporary measure bought a cheap on owner 2001 Ford Focus 1.8tddi from a friend here intending to only keep it for a short time but with no pressing imperative to change that extended to nearly 4 years, it's only really because I've had to take measures to scrape it through the emissions checks at ITV (CT) time two years running I decided it's time had come so I sold it as soon as I'd got it through it's latest test and bought the Skoda Yeti.

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My brother has just got hit with two £80 fines after coming to visit in my area of London that has recently become an Ultra Low Émissions Zone. He travelled in a 2013 Vw Golf diesel, and forgot to check its status beforehand on the Transport for London website. ( Even for considerably older cars, a petrol version would have been ok. )

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