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4 hours ago, NormanH said:

I did it and came up with someone who won't win, but then I expected that.

There was a similar one in LeFigaro but the questions were a little different.

Yes, same for the one in Le Monde, which went somewhat deeper (two levels). For me, it was the same - the candidate closest to my views (and who I always intended to vote for) has no chance.

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Strange that there are no comments on the first round election results on this forum.

One of the surprising local results is that around us about a dozen communes including ours voted Le Pen.

In our commune Le Pen was first with 28.6% followed by Melenchon with 22.8% with Macron third on 22.1%

Zemmour trailed behind on 5.5%

Strange french political joke.

How do you find a Le Pen voter?

Look for a communist who has been burgled twice.

Hmm - I'm still chewing that one over!

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Of the two places whose votes I have seen down here, it was Le Pen followed by Macron and then Melechon.  Standard these days.  Chatting to a French friend yessterday she says they are left to chose between the devil and the deep blue sea (not her words, but what she meant!). I can't see the French will be satisfied whatever the outcome.

Edited by Judith
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Down here in the South, it was predominately Le Pen.  To my surprise, she ‘edged’ Melenchon in our Commune.

I’ll probably be proved miles wrong, but here’s my theory.

Macron was as pleased as he could be over the 1st round result.   Le Pen only just beat Melenchon (by a percentage point or so), but for Macron defending against Le Pen will be ‘easier’ than against Melenchon + M has told his voters not to vote for Le Pen.

Some will take no notice, but many will simply abstain.  Macron will come through and I’d be happy with that.  Best of an average bunch IMO.

 

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10 hours ago, Gardian said:

Down here in the South, it was predominately Le Pen.  To my surprise, she ‘edged’ Melenchon in our Commune.

I’ll probably be proved miles wrong, but here’s my theory.

Macron was as pleased as he could be over the 1st round result.   Le Pen only just beat Melenchon (by a percentage point or so), but for Macron defending against Le Pen will be ‘easier’ than against Melenchon + M has told his voters not to vote for Le Pen.

Some will take no notice, but many will simply abstain.  Macron will come through and I’d be happy with that.  Best of an average bunch IMO.

 

The flaw is that Melenchon has "instructed" his voters to not vote for Le Pen, meaning that they should abstain or vote for Macron.

Abstaining isn't going to help Macron, and I can't somehow see many dyed in the wool left wing Melenchon voters voting for Macron.

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Our département has always voted centre-right and continued this year to do so. There was, though, a difference; previously, it was always LR, but this time LREM (the French Tory party) came out on top with the 'official LR' 6th (5th in my commune). 

Interesting sondage from this morning concerning Mélenchon supporters intentions for 24th: just under half (with nose pegs) to Macron with about 1/4 each for Le Pen and abstention.

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Ours surprisingly voted for MLP as the last time Macron was well ahead after the 1st tour. I hope it will be an exciting few days leading up to the final vote - The UK press are saying it's very close but the media here are all-in for Macron.

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Nicolas Sarkozy endorsement of Emmanuel Macron ahead of the second round of presidential elections came on the condition the conservative ex-president could "choose his next prime minister and 50 MPs", according to reports.

The Right-winger's backing comes at a touchy time for Mr Macron, who is engaged in a high-stakes charm offensive to woo Leftist supporters of Jean-Luc Mélenchon, who came third in last Sunday’s first round, taking barely 400,000 votes less than Marine Le Pen, who is through to the April 24 runoff.

A Kea partners poll out on Wednesday saw Mr Macron on 53 per cent but there are still plenty of undecided voters.

Elected in 2017 on a "neither Right nor Left" platform, the 44-year old has been accused by rivals of abandoning the Left despite pumping billions into state aid during the Covid crisis and to cushion rising energy and petrol prices.

On Wednesday, he insisted there were no strings attached to Mr Sarkozy, 67, who led France from 2007 to 2012, throwing his weight behind him.

"There was no agreement," he told France 2 television on Wednesday after saying he was “honoured” to receive his “clear backing”.

But according to Le Monde, Mr Sarkozy told a senior member of the Republicans Party: “I posed my conditions to Macron: I want to choose the prime minister and a group of 50 MP."

If true it raises corruption to another level!! I doubt this will be a topic on the TV channels. I wonder if the majority of the French ever read or hear of 'across the board' items like this.

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'One might argue that her agenda smacks of national socialism, but there is no mileage in trying to evoke loose parallels with the 1930s. Le Pen is competing at the ballot box and under the rule of law. Nobody suggests that she plans a 1933 Enabling Act or a French police state once inside the Élysée Palace'

The above being the only reference to 'national Socialism' in the article hardly makes the Telegraph guilty of accusing her of being a 'national Socialist'. In the same article there is ample criticism of Macron. Strange that criticism of Le Pen is shifting from being extreme right to extreme left but most never knew the difference anyway!  thinking the Nazis were extreme right!!!

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Some quotations in case the article is behind a paywall:

 

"Le Pen has a fair chance of scooping up the neglected constituency of the old left, and that could swing the final outcome on April 24. Her economic agenda is a celebration of the welfare state and the French social model. 

She backed the protest of trade unions against the reform of the pension system in 2019, and again last year over the weakening of unemployment protection, describing President Macron’s policies as “shameful, economically stupid, inhumane, and unjust”. 

Her plan is a mix of Keynesian big spending and redistribution towards the working poor and young families, those suffering an erosion of real living standards long before commodity inflation hit them with a hammer blow.

She has married left-wing economics with law-and-order nationalism to make a very potent political brew. "

"Le Pen has been turning her party into a statist, anti-globalist, defender of the Modèle Français ever since taking charge in 2011"

"Le Pen has not abandoned her right-wing policies on immigration, nor her defence of France’s cultural terroir. She remains a nationalist to the core, and an implacable foe of Jean Monnet’s European project. She will endeavour to undermine the primacy of EU law and the hegemony of the Commission from within. 

One might argue that her agenda smacks of national socialism, but there is no mileage in trying to evoke loose parallels with the 1930s. Le Pen is competing at the ballot box and under the rule of law. Nobody suggests that she plans a 1933 Enabling Act or a French police state once inside the Élysée Palace.

Her ideological enemies are Anglo-Saxon globalist capitalism and the EU superstate in equal measure.

 

 

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Two questions for the day..

1) How many people will abstain from voting or vote 'blanc' as they say. Or draw a rude picture of a knôb on their ballet paper. 

2) Will there be riots tonight accross France when the winner is announced ? 

There were 'tensions' in Paris yesterday. And that was before the vote.

Or it might just pass off peacefully because nobody cares anymore. 

 

 

 

 

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Well...

- 30% (ish) abstained from voting

- 10% (ish) white vote or nulled ballots.

- Riots in Paris and elswhere. 

- Rural areas (where most Brits live LOL) voted MLP.

Anyway, we can safely say that about 25 % of the French population wants Mr Macron. 75% don't. 

Is that a win ?

Mr Macron wants to 'unite' France. The question of the day, why did he not do that over the last 5 years rather than dividing it, attacking the UK and other EU countries ? 

My daughter will be 20, my son will be 18 and baby ALBF will be 8 years old with this bloke is consigned to history. I will be 54. What will be left of France ? 

Scary. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by alittlebitfrench
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A few figures.

Registered voters: 48,700000

Voted for Macron 18,779641

 

On a similar number of voters in the UK

Conservative votes in the 2019 election: 13,966,565

Votes for leave in the Brexit referendum  17,410,742

Neither of those was a majority of registered voters and both have been accepted.

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It is not so much that Macron won the election but more a case of the voters,  who bothered to vote,  rejected Le Penn by voting for the only available alternative.

 

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3 minutes ago, NormanH said:

On a similar number of voters in the UK

Conservative votes in the 2019 election: 13,966,565

Votes for leave in the Brexit referendum  17,410,742

The significance of these statistics to residents of France would be??

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