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A Crude Phishing attempt supposed to be from AMELI


NormanH
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The link gave this obvious attempt at extracting bank details:

Do you not think you took a leap of faith by clicking a link within an email which, by your post, you believed to be spam/phishing?

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Do you think that merely clicking a link as in 'open in another tab' is rash?

I use Linux which would require me to enter a password for anything to be installed on my system, and have a firewall.

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52 minutes ago, NormanH said:

Do you think that merely clicking a link as in 'open in another tab' is rash?

I use Linux which would require me to enter a password for anything to be installed on my system, and have a firewall.

But might you not have alerted them to the fact that your email address is live by clicking on a link .. the phishers have no need to install anything on your system.

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Norman

I don't know enough about Linux to be able to reply accurately ref your personal computer.

But this link (it's ok 😉) from Malwarebytes explains about part of the link access address at the top of the page you showed :

https://blog.malwarebytes.com/detections/plesk-page/

Also at the top of your link page you have 'distracted-elbakyan' as part of the address .. which has been half-inched from the infamous Alexandre Elbakyan .. wiki link https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Elbakyan

It looks as though the phishing attempt is quite a humorous example .. cleverly done, but still out to deceive. 

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6 minutes ago, NormanH said:

On the other hand it isn't the email associated with my Ameli account..

That makes sense .. you are aware of that but other, more unwary souls might not realise and be tempted to reply.

If you click on the link in a mail it does alert the sender of the mail that you have opened the mail and that your email is alive and kicking and that has a value.

Edited by suein56
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I always advise people who receive dodgy mails, or even questionable mails, to hover their cursor over the link and copy the address into Google/Duck Duck Go .. whichever search engine they use and do a quick search.

If anything at all suspicious comes up then on no account click to open on any link.

You could forward the mail to CPAM .. but I have forgotten their phishing address.

Otherwise delete it.

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Also, as an explanation of why it is unwise to open any link in a 'seems like phishing' mail, it might be worth your while casting a glance at THIS.

I would also support suein56's replies. Basically, why take the risk?

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