Jump to content

Carol Thatcher and the G word.


Gastines
 Share

Recommended Posts

I wonder what most peoples response is to the latest upset at the BBC. It appears that certain presenters/chefs  can F and blind and say any sexual suggestive phrase they wish but words that are used in many non-racial forms are jumped on from a great hieght by the perfects and P.C. brigade. Just because certain words and actions are now deemed legal or illegal by the cash in the pocket Lords /M.P's are we supposed to change our opinions and language to suit? Not that long ago Homosexuality was against the law,still is in many countries,but while I personally try and avoid it am I not allowed to have an opinion anymore or allowed to express it?

I wonder what Mr.Robertson of Jam fame would have to say?

Regards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 246
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Political correctness seems to have be hoisted onto the UK in a non-democratic way.

I do think the Thatcher child is very strange - definately Jimmy Savilles love child.

Apparently he did spend christmas with the Thatchers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Freedom of opinion is one thing, but expressing that opinion requires tact and sensitivity, particularly in someone working for Public Service Broadcasting

The fact that she still has the word in her active vocabulary is an indicator of a deep-seated prejudice, and the fact of using it suggests an irredeemable error of judgement.

I hope we never see her again. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="Dog"]

definately Jimmy Savilles love child.

[/quote]

I thought that was Boris Johnson. [;-)]

It is a word that is offensive to many, so public figures like Carol Thatcher should not use it.

If you find Gordon Ramsay offensive then you should tell the TV company responsible for his programmes - same with Jonathan Ross.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="ErnieY"][quote user="Dog"]I do think the Thatcher child is very strange - definately Jimmy Savilles love child.

Apparently he did spend christmas with the Thatchers.[/quote]You've fair put me off my lunch [+o(]


[/quote]

Huge belly laughs! [:D][:D][:D]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="NormanH"]
Freedom of opinion is one thing, but expressing that opinion requires tact and sensitivity, particularly in someone working for Public Service Broadcasting
The fact that she still has the word in her active vocabulary is an indicator of a deep-seated prejudice, and the fact of using it suggests an irredeemable error of judgement.
I hope we never see her again. 
[/quote]

Would you have windows into peoples' minds and souls? Dangerous, very dangerous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="Puzzled"]

I do and try and have a look at a number of UK news websites. It does almost seem that there is a concerted effort by the DM and its readers to have certain words that died out with ' Love thy neighbour' reintroduced as acceptable mainstream terms. 

Referring to a black tennis player as a gollywog, I don't know how that can't be racist. It may be harmless to those of us with whiteskin but I'm sure many people of afro caribbean origin growing up in the UK not that many years ago wouldn't agree. Bit like calling someone a 'paki' , it just isn't the same as Brit because for many people who had it shouted in their direction it was usually followed by 'f**k off back home'.

[/quote]

Are the thought police and anti-racists going to break into my house rumage through my 78 rpm records and steal my collection of Good 'ol (word that cannot be said) Songs and brand me a racist.

I am concidering becoming a racist as a demonstration against inherent specism in the world.

Why is Paki any worse that Brit? It is very difficult to remember all the countries that give their intials to make up Pakistan. is it Punjab, Afghanistan Kurdistan Inmiristan Surinam Turkmenistan my memory defeats me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="Dog"][quote user="Puzzled"]

I do and try and have a look at a number of UK news websites. It does almost seem that there is a concerted effort by the DM and its readers to have certain words that died out with ' Love thy neighbour' reintroduced as acceptable mainstream terms. 

Referring to a black tennis player as a gollywog, I don't know how that can't be racist. It may be harmless to those of us with whiteskin but I'm sure many people of afro caribbean origin growing up in the UK not that many years ago wouldn't agree. Bit like calling someone a 'paki' , it just isn't the same as Brit because for many people who had it shouted in their direction it was usually followed by 'f**k off back home'.

[/quote]

Are the thought police and anti-racists going to break into my house rumage through my 78 rpm records and steal my collection of Good 'ol (word that cannot be said) Songs and brand me a racist.

I am concidering becoming a racist as a demonstration against inherent specism in the world.

Why is Paki any worse that Brit? It is very difficult to remember all the countries that give their intials to make up Pakistan. is it Punjab, Afghanistan Kurdistan Inmiristan Surinam Turkmenistan my memory defeats me.

[/quote]

Or as Prince Phillip once said Bongo Bongo land [:D]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understood that the remark was made privately, off air, between media people in the "green room", hence it wasn't broadcast at all. For those people to then run to the BBC and complain about a private remark is a huge over-reaction - if they objected, far better to debate it in private. Now if she'd made the remark on air then perhaps that's a different matter but off-air smacks to me of telling tales.

I know that people find certain terms offensive, but they are only words. There's double standards on this racist witchhunt too, apparently black people can refer to others as "n****rs", and in a jokey matey way, but heaven help a white person who might use that word. So it's not the word that is deemed offensive, but it depends who's using it.

Total over-reaction. And the media are having a field day with it ...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

RH you are possibly right, but then he does come from the area where he would be surrounded by said dark skinned persons. And as she is alleged to have said that a tennis player reminded her (in looks) of the (g-word) that she used to see on a jam jar many years ago, in the great master plan of things does it really matter. There are far far more important things going on in the world to worry about a minor discretion like this! I bet a certain J. Ross is laughing all the way to the bank along with G Ramsay and others of the foul-mouthed brigade still "workin".

tuppence

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why are people from Baluchistan freely called Baluchis (without any prejudice) and Pakistanis are offended at the word Paki?  I just think it's a light hearted p... take to be called a pommie whatsit, many other 'nicknames' spring to mind.  Poitical correctness gone beserk IMHO! ps. still got my golliwog badges, sad or what?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wasn't aware that it was a private conversation but in any case I find that word to describe someone extremely offensive.

I have to admit I watched the jungle program she was in and won [:$] and thought she was a very warm genuine article and a true English eccentric. However, if she uses this term even in jest about a black person, sadly I feel I have been wrong about her character.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="woolybanana"]But hang on, the word was used in a private conversation, not in  a public forum.[/quote]

Which is why I wrote "The fact that she still has the word in her active vocabulary is an indicator of a deep-seated prejudice,"

Is it OK to be the professional hypocrite who uses this language in personal circles where she can do a 'wink wink, nudge nudge', but then adopts a PC persona for public consumption?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Norman, my experience is that that is what a heck of a lot of people do because they are scared of the thought police. I do not like your implication that one should judge people's minds by the odd word they use that may not have political approval, and then sanction them. Though that may be the policy in public service these days.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This Forum is obviously very much alive. Now I'm waiting for the Royals all to be censored for using words that it seems are fairly common to their vocabulary. I must say that I find it quite farcical that the powers that be complain about the yobbish behaviour and language used by youngsters today and yet they lap up the F.word by that foul mouthed Gordon,the other one, the continual little snide remarks by Norton and his ilk. It seems that you must fit into a certain mould to progress as a celebrity these days.Luckily I have an OFF button but I did think of adding an F to it.

Regards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote user="woolybanana"]Norman, my experience is that that is what a heck of a lot of people do because they are scared of the thought police..[/quote]

I accept that, and your idea that it was a colleague trying to get  at her  is feasible.

However who do you mean by "the thought police"?

I know that you are not a lazy thinker, but isn't that a rather vague general  term, which appeals to a sort of libertarian sentiment without examining the who/why/what of the issue?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't presume to know what was in Carol Thatcher's mind.

For my own part I used to have one of these cuddly toys when I was a child. I loved him, quite literally, to bits. I now understand that the word has been used in a derogatory way and have excluded it from my vocabulary. If I used it by accident, it would certainly not be meant in any derogatory fashion.

To sack her when Jonathan Ross was only suspended tells us something about the BBC's priorities. He makes them a lot of money; Carol Thatcher doesn't.

I used not to mind the F word, but now I'm suffering from a surfeit of it and can no longer watch people like Gordon Ramsey.

Funny old world eh ?

Hoddy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am not British and have never heard of this term until recently so perhaps to me it sounds extremely offensive where as to others that grew up with this term it is not.

However, I would imagine that most black people would feel uncomfortable being called this regardless of the intent. But perhaps I am wrong. She did appear to be a kind warm woman. When I heard that she had used this term my jaw literally dropped. So perhaps I do have it wrong.[8-)]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...