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No Tax Paid Yet


Grecian
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Hi chessie, a bit mixed up maybe, but yours is a common misconception. Not all public sector pensions are 'Government Pensions' for the purpose of the dual tax treaty. The main 'Government Pensions' are Civil Service, Teachers, Police, & Fire Service. Probably to do with how these services are funded via Local Authorities or (in the case of the civil service) because you are in the direct service of the government.

The NHS is funded differently, via NHS England, through local health trusts rather than through local authorities. I therefore assume that NHS staff are not deemed to be employed directly by government, unlike those categories mentioned above. I confirmed the tax status of my NHS pension with HMRC at the outset when I drew it. It is indeed correct that it is wholly taxed in France, and I have an NT tax code on it in the UK.
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Just completed my return for last year. As far as I can see, one just does it as per normal.

A bit of a struggle, as I had a couple of extra items compared with last year, and they have changed the forms yet again, moving the various boxes around.

At last there is a box to tell them about liability for social charges.

Also, there was no estimate of tax due forthcoming when I completed the chore, presumably I have to wait for our Avis, and argue afterwards if necessary.

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This is an interesting thread, and I am following it.

Our son, has simply being paying french PAYE since January, and he says that as he had  his normal income last year and nothing exceptional, that that, as far as he and his colleagues are concerned will simply be ignored and he just pays for this year.

Are he and his work mates wrong in this.

I am surprised that les impots have not insisted that everyone now pay monthly based on previous years for this year, but it would seem that they haven't. I sort of thought that they would.

And yet, in the UK we only pay twice a year, a vague sum based on the previous year once a year and a further amount based on the actual self assessment declaration. And that works for us, but I am used to the french system and amazingly it feels pretty similar.

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No, your son is right. If the old scheme and the new PAYE scheme were both operating in 2019, then as well as the monthly deductions from 2019 income taken since January under PAYE, tax would also need to be paid in February, May & September based on 2018 income. Clearly, this would have caused more than just the gilets jaunes protests, therefore to avoid paying tax on both 2018 & 2019 'regular' income in the same year, tax will not (ever) be paid on the 2018 income. As far as the French goverment is concerned, they will still receive a years tax from everyone in 2019, only the income on which it is calculated is that also earned in 2019, rather than being calculated in arrears on 2018 income.
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