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Cooperlola


cooperlola2
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I can understand that, Coops, that kind of thing would worry me too, something you have no control over. I guess you just have to trust the medics that they know what they're doing,

Do they tell you to eat certain foods to replenish what you're losing?

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I have my own chair, Norman and am well past the pride stage!  When I go to the hospital for visits I always take it but the problem is that my nurse's cabinet is down a little back street in the middle of the village and that is currently shut off.  If this carries on then I'll just get her to come to me. 
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Hello Coops - I just wanted to say that I'll be thinking of you and yours and I do hope it all goes well and that you'll soon be sorted.

Deborah, you have given so much to other people, quite selflessly, simply because you believed it was fair and just.  As a result, you have a huge number of people now thinking of you and wishing you well... this is a measure of the kind of woman you are... and my point is that because of this you should never be past the pride stage... although of course I know really that it was just an expression and a figure of speach.

and... I found this and thought of you... "Auto racing is boring except when a car is going at least 172 miles per hour upside down"

see you soon

xx

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Aw, Rose...[:$]

I guess as far as pride is concerned that I mean what's the point?  I don't think anybody should ever feel too proud to ask for help or be seen as inferior because they are less able to do certain things than anybody else.  If people judge you for not being "normal" then that's their problem, not yours/mine.  What drove me during the FHI thing was exactly that - why should an illness which one can do nothing about make one life less valid than another?  I'm honestly not any more selfless than the next person - I just get seriously wound up by the concept of discrimination in any form.  

Nice to remember what it was like to be angry about something other than Margaret the Lump.[:D]

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Coops, I do understand that this bleeding must be very frightening for you.  No harm just telling the medics that you are worried and, if they are any good as doctors, they should take the patient's worries into account.  Do go on about it to them and don't suffer in silence.  Stiff upper lips are all very well but don't take it too far, will you?

Ok, then I have a couple of days off in the old chateau before I have to start concentrating on sending you more positive vibes...that's good because I can't seem to multi-task as I used to be able to do!

Anyway, all the very best on Friday and, even if the bleeding is better by the time you see a medical person, just tell them what it's been like and also that you are inquiete.

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[quote user="Rabbie"]

Coops, better to let them know  you're worried about the bleeding than be a hero. We need you back here as  your usual feisty self. [/quote][:)]

Back from a morning of intense activity.  I once again mentioned several times (to the anaesthetist and oncology nurse both) about the bloody flux [:-))] and still nobody is as perturbed about it as me.  I have explained to one of the gynae surgeons, two duty docs in the gynae emergency department and two nurses there, plus my gp and all don't dismiss it exactly but say not to worry.  Of course though, it's not happening to them.  Happily I'm in overnight before the PAC implant so the nurses on the ward will be able to see first hand the amounts I'm dealing with, and I'll see my gynae surgeon again as she's back from her hols and is putting the PAC in.

The really good news is that the MRI on the boobs was competely clear.  Nice quick response to a rapid (only 15 mins unlike the ones I've had done on other bits) process, and much more comfortable than the ones I've had lying on my back. 

The first chemo is a week on Thursday and then all the fun starts.  Meanwhile, I've now got to get to the hairdressers and the wig shop.[:(]

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[quote user="gardengirl "]

Good luck if/when it gets to wigs - do we get a picture? [:D]

[/quote][:D]

I have been given a great long list of wig sellers in the Sarthe.  There was one not far from me who is a hairdresser.  I have just spoken to her and she sounded really lovely, also evidently well used to people in my situation so very sympa.  Thus a week today I'm having "The Chop" (I'm told you can lose rather less hair if it's short) and doing some fittings/stylings.  Happily also my top-up contributes a fair whack so I don't need to stick to the 125€ state budget.

Whether or not you get a pic will depend on how I feel.  I'm none too fond of my pictorial self as it is, let alone sans barnet!

I'm now going to visit a website recommended to me by the very kind Mr Pickles and order a few hats and stuff....  When in doubt, shop.[:D]

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Any mention of the cold cap Coops, they use them at St Thomas' and Guys. The cold restricts the flow of blood to the follicles and so the chemo drugs?

Good luck this week, I know it feels like your on an express train but getting it all going as soon after surgery as they can is key apparently to it's success.

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[quote user="Théière"]

Any mention of the cold cap Coops, they use them at St Thomas' and Guys. The cold restricts the flow of blood to the follicles and so the chemo drugs?

[/quote]I have been offered it but the few people whom I know who have tried it say that it is very uncomfortable and not always of much use.  I am extremely prone to headaches which can result from using one, thus at the moment I'm humming and hah-ing.  I may give it a go but I probably need to get most of my hair cut off before I start treatment because, so I am told, the longer it is, the more inclined it is to fall out.  Yoh, hoh, what fun, eh?

Today my rehab doc' has agreed that I have reached the end of my useful treatment for the leg so at the very least when I see the accident insurance docs in a couple of weeks they should sign me off for that and I can get my compensation at last.  Then I can look at car brochures instead of wig catalogues.[:D]

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your story rings some bells for me Coops, 3 years ago when I had to have chemo, my hair started falling out after 12 days and made my head so sore. In the end I had other half shave it for me, both of us in tears, but it felt so much better once it had gone.

I did have a wig which I found very uncomfortable and hot, so most of the time I had the buffs, covered up a baldy head and kept it from getting too hot/cold.

Having said that my hair grew back the same as before and this summer it has been driving me crackers being hot and sweaty! Life was more comfortable and easy without hair.

Good luck with it all, it will soon be a memory of the past.
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You may find it's not any worse than mild Alopecia, my wife had her hair cut and restyled 'urchin' style before treatment so that it might not seem so bad, and was persuaded (against her better judgement) to go for a princess Di wig, and a silk scarf, after the event she decided she needed neither, so they both remained unused.
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