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Never on a Sunday or, in France, any other day either


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L'etrangere - I kept saying to myself as I read the article: Mmmm, that's France.

In France, the answer is always 'no'.  But 'no' doesn't always mean 'no'.  It may just mean 'come back after lunch'.  It usually means that if you reason enough, it's 'maybe' but definitely not at lunchtime or at weekends or in August.

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[quote user="Lou"]

Dear god, does someone actually pay this guy to write such utter drivel??

I suppose there must be an art to it.......

 

Lou

[/quote]

  The Art of Drivel Writing?  Yes, both husband and wife appear to have got it off to a T.........

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[quote user="Tony F Dordogne"]Is that piece supposed to be ironic or cutting edge or something?  Probably best not to say what I think, apart from the pair of them seem to be real t*****s.[/quote]

I think you have your 's' and 't' mixed up.[:)]

All the same he has  a point "Everything in the country is for sale, or about to be laid off."
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[quote user="Sprogster"]

Lighten up everyone, it is meant to be tongue in cheek!

It made me laugh anyway and there are elements of truth!

[/quote]

Well, I must admit, at first I thought it was meant to be humorous, but then I began to wonder if he was actually being serious .... !!  There are indeed elements of truth, but maybe these topics are really why they left the Languedoc???

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[quote user="Sprogster"]Its a 'she' by the way. [/quote]

Errr.... Helena FP may be, but the author of the article quoted in the OP is her husband, who is (presumably) a "he" ... unless Rupert has become a feminine name recently and I didn't get the memo ...

Regards

Pickles

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It is a he and it is in part why they left and surely we can all recognise something of France in the piece?  I can certainly see the bank issue - though they should have expected that - and the bit about all foreigners appearing as hugely rich is something many of us have probably come across whilst house hunting.  And even in our small circle of friends an alarming number of people have moved on in the last 12/18 months whether because they want to cash in as a result of the Euro/Sterling exchange rate or because they're bored/life in rural France isn't what they hoped/expected or they can't hack it or have run out of cash or whatever. 

But what rang true with me more than anything was Rupert's comment at the end and how France is a great country to retire to.  The first Brits I ever knew to live here were retired friends of my parents, one of whom is still there now (in her late 80s).  And when we first moved to the country 20 years ago everyone said, "it's not a good place to live and work in but it's terrific if you're retired".  And I personally still believe there's an element of truth in that.

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"And when we first moved to the country 20

years ago everyone said, "it's not a good place to live and work in but

it's terrific if you're retired".  And I personally still believe

there's an element of truth in that."

It's a perfectly fine place to live and work in, if you can get a job.

Quite a few French people manage to do it.

As

for retiring, it's fine if you have a substantial pension, or money

from the sale of a property,  but no easier then anywhere else if you

are poor.

Of course I am not paid for my insights, so they aren't worth anything.
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Nevermind, Norman, and don't be so self-deprecating.  I, for one, do value your insights and have enjoyed your posts (when they've been knowledgeable and sensible).

Call me biased, but I can't abide either her or her husband.  And, no, possibly not a considered opinion as such but aren't I allowed some ranting now and again and to be totally illogical?

Believe it or not, I'm like that with people I know as well.  Just can't stand some people and totally love others............no need to always have a reason, is there?[:P]

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[quote user="NormanH"]"As for retiring, it's fine if you have a substantial pension, or money from the sale of a property,  but no easier then anywhere else if you are poor..[/quote]

 

Of course the quality of life during retirement is improved if you have a good pension, though I'd argue maintaining reasonably good health is a very important factor too.  But think about life in rural France and unless you're very fortunate and can combine living somewhere very beautiful with a decent job, surely it lends itself more to retired people living a quiet life than those needing to earn a fair living and/or those with young families?   

There was an article somewhere recently about people moving back from the countryside (Cornwall especially) to the cities in England as early retirees/downsizers had suddenly realised they needed to live in a place where they could generate cash.    So this isn't an issue unique to France. 

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You are quite right about health but I think you are presuming that British people all live in rural France. I have two tiny properties rather than one, a choice I made when I first came here simply to keep my options open. I now live as a retiree

in the city one, simply because I need to be within easy reach,  without a car, of reasonable health facilities.This is something I have posted about before as I have seen sad cases of couples where the French speaker or the car driver dies or becomes incapacitated, leaving the other person alone and unable to communicate .

I can't imagine anyone moving to rural France to make a living, unless in some countryside- related business.

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So Normie, you are a man of two properties. Hmmm, so much for pleading poverty![6]

Anyway, driving round as I do and seeing both loadsa markets and empty properties, it strikes me as odd that the latter are not inhabited by people in the arts and crafts fields, the results of whose labours could be sold in said markets. France seems to have a dearth of such things.

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[quote user="woolybanana"]

So Normie, you are a man of two properties. Hmmm, so much for pleading poverty![6]

Anyway, driving round as I do and seeing both loadsa markets and empty properties, it strikes me as odd that the latter are not inhabited by people in the arts and crafts fields, the results of whose labours could be sold in said markets. France seems to have a dearth of such things.

[/quote]

Such peaple would, no doubt, have to be registered and have to pay cotisations etc

. As George Bush said "do the French have a word for entrepreneur?"
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[quote user="NormanH"]I can't imagine anyone moving to rural France to make a living, unless in some countryside- related business.[/quote]

Absolutely, neither can I but we've seen enough people on this forum over the years saying that was part of their plan.  (And invariably they didn't have a word of French or transferable skills.)

Norman, re getting your thoughts in to print and being paid (albeit a pittance) for it, many magazines welcome articles from freelancers, I would have thought one like Living France especially...

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[quote user="NormanH"]I can't imagine anyone moving to rural France to make a living, unless in some countryside- related business.[/quote]

Absolutely, neither can I but we've seen enough people on this forum over the years saying that was part of their plan.  (And invariably they didn't have a word of French or transferable skills.)

Norman, re getting your thoughts in to print and being paid (albeit a pittance) for it, many magazines welcome articles from freelancers, I would have thought one like Living France especially...

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