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Where do you want to be laid to rest?


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As Norman says it's interesting the different thinking between the law in the England and France. It's illegal to scatter ashes in your own garden in France, why I can't imagine? But if I lived there and it was the law, of course I would respect it. It appears that in England that the environment agency have the most say, and probably quite right to.

http://www.ifishoulddie.co.uk/scattering-or-interring-ashes-c71.html.

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[quote user="NickP"]... It's illegal to scatter ashes in your own garden in France, why I can't imagine?[/quote]

Why it's illegal is clearly explained in the post I made in reply to you earlier on.

I'll let Google translate it for clarification (of sorts)

"The scattering of ashes in a private garden is not allowed.

Indeed,

the place where the ashes will be scattered will be a place of

contemplation for the families and should be accessible to all.

The

garden of the deceased is not a public place and can be transferred,

the new owner may be compelled to accommodate relatives who wish to

collect.
"

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[quote user="Clair"][quote user="NickP"]... It's illegal to scatter ashes in your own garden in France, why I can't imagine?[/quote]
Why it's illegal is clearly explained in the post I made in reply to you earlier on.

I'll let Google translate it for clarification (of sorts)

"The scattering of ashes in a private garden is not allowed.

Indeed, the place where the ashes will be scattered will be a place of contemplation for the families and should be accessible to all.

The garden of the deceased is not a public place and can be transferred, the new owner may be compelled to accommodate relatives who wish to collect."


[/quote]

I'm well aware of your earlier explanation and I fully understand the implications of the French law, my comment was an attempt at humour to show that I thought the law was ludicrous. i.e. A rhetorical question

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[quote user="Clair"]NickP,

I wasn't sure you understood, in view of your earlier comment that "the law did not apply to individuals"...
[/quote]

I actually said "I wouldn't think that "Normans law" applies to individuals, as it only mentions using or managing collective places outside of public cemetery's or authorised grounds.

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[quote user="NormanH"][quote user="cooperlola"]

Norman, why should my ashes be treated with "respect" if that's not what I want and why should somebody else define what that respect is?   Once I'm dead, to my mind that's it - I just always thought it would be fun to be dumped in the place where I've always been happiest - at the side of a race track (or preferably on it!)  It does seem a bit nuts to go to the trouble of being reduced to a harmless residue only to discover that we can't dump this anywhere we like. I realise that this is not your view, but a legislative one and you are the messenger - I'm not trying to shoot you, just throwing something into the debate for us all to discuss.  As you so rightly say, best to be in possession of the facts of the legal side of this so you can make a choice, as with so many things.

When my sister died we sprinkled her ashes in the crem' with my father's but perloined a small jar full which we discreetly dumped "elsewhere", contrary to all regulations.  Nobody knows where except my mother, myself and one of her friends who helped me get rid of them when nobody was looking.  What was the harm, I wonder?  At least a small part of her ended up where she wanted to be put and, to my mind, nobody else has been harmed by this.

[/quote]

I think that this is a very interesting example of the differences between French mindset,  and an English one: take as another example the Law . France has a  a centralised 'code', whereas English  law evolves from common law and is then adapted by precedents.

That is a gross generalisation which could easily be shot down by the legal experts here, but I do find that French people expect to have things defined and set down in 'texte's , and the debate is about finding the appropriate one, whereas English people are more used to arguing about what seems to be the principle.

In other words In France things are defined for you by a higher authority.

Now to duck....

[/quote]

Which most of the French then choose to ignore! Smoking bans, smashed up speed radars, designated parking places etc...

A close friend of mine (French) lost a family member last month - half of him is in the family columbarium and the other half will soon be scattered on the Island where he met his wife.
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