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French "flour" translation help please!


mmaddock
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Once more French language question...I'm just about to make some scones...we have a cupboard full of French flour (we weren't sure which to buy, so we bought a selection!)..

..can someome now please tell me which one is the Self-raising variety?!  If there is such a thing in France?  None of them seem to have anything on them that I can translate into something that makes sense in English!

Cheers,

Matt

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Farine à gateaux (by itself) does not mean it contains raising agents, it means it's sifted so it does not from lumps when mixed (apparently).

Farine avec poudre levante incorporée is self-raising flour.

Levure chimique means raising agent (sold in packs of 5 or 6 next to the flour)

Levure de boulanger means yeast (also in packs of 5 or 6 next to the flour)

Levure naturelle de boulanger means fresh yeast (sold in most supermarkets next to fresh breads and cakes)

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I have a "cuisine & patisserie" flour labeled "Farine Fluide", but it doesn't mention anything about "levure" that I can see.  What on earth is Farine "Fluide"?!  Maybe I'm being stupid, but I can't even think what it could mean! (of course I understand the literal translation of the word, but not what it means in this context)

I do have one that I know is just a regular flour - maybe I'll have a dig around and find out where on earth I put the bicarb to make it raising flour myself!!

Cheers,

Matt

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I never pay the inflated prices for farine liquide, it is supposed to stop les grumeaux, (lumps) and I have never found it any better than the cheapest on the shelf.

The SR flour I prefer is Leader Price's. I find that France Farine's Golden bags sometimes seem to lack in rising agent.

 

ps I make old fashioned scones, using plain flour with bicarb and cream of tartare as rising agents.

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Ah yes, I was just about to ask about cream of tartar...

I spent Christmas with French friends in France, and they wanted to have fresh English scones made for them.  So I took the bicarb and cream of tartar with me (heaven knows what the drug squad would have made of the two containers of white powder if they had rummaged my suitcase!).  And I found some Cornish clotted cream in Tesco - mmmmmmmmmm.

Can you get cream of tartar in France?  Does it have another name?  (I am sure I have seen bicarb .)
Or can one just use a good self-raising flour, as seems to be suggested near the beginning of this thread, and forget these other two ingredients?

Angela

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