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Yorkie puds!


maude
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Has anyone a successfull recipe for yorkie puds using French flour!tried the recent Jamie Oliver recipe and they came out flat after collapsing.looked good at first then brewers droop!My wife is exasperated with her attempt.Only fancy them once or twice per year-BUT----------Maude
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I think every family in Yorkshire has it's own recipe and they all vary.

Get your oven hot 200-220°c. I saw Jamie Oliver make them with one egg, but I always put two in for that amount of flour. Make sure it is simple farine de ble type 55.

Sometimes I heat the oil in the baking pans, sometimes I put the mix into cold oil, both methods work, as long as the oven is up to the right temperature. Then I leave them to bake for 15 to 20 mins and do not open the oven door until they are risen and well golden.

Give it a go and let us know.
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[quote user="maude"]Has anyone a successfull recipe for yorkie puds using French flour!tried the recent Jamie Oliver recipe and they came out flat after collapsing.looked good at first then brewers droop!My wife is exasperated with her attempt.Only fancy them once or twice per year-BUT----------Maude[/quote]

I thought a yorkie was a chocolate bar or, a breed of dog!

.

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[quote user="maude"]Has anyone a successfull recipe for yorkie puds using French flour!...[/quote]

As TU/idun mentions, there are different types of French flour.

Look on the side or top of the packet where you should find there a T ** number:

Broadly speaking:

  • T45 is good for pastry/cakes
  • T55 is good for for light cakes
  • T65 is good for bread-making (I use T65 for almost everything)
  • T80 is good for bread-making
  • T110 is a light wholewheat flour
  • T150 is like wholewheat flour
See here and here for more details on types of wheat flours.

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Umm I thought they were supposed to collapse, hence why the use of plain flour.? My grandad came from Sheffield, hence why Nan was the expert at Yorkshires - hers emerged from the oven with the centre collapsed on which she served the meat with lashings of gravy.

To me (and yes it might make me a philistine!) but those Aunt Bessie's ones are pretty much how my Nan's Yorky Puds were. Sorry!!
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The advice about different flours will be very helpful when we move to France soon. But one thing I need to know. Clair suggests using T55 flour for cakes. Do you need to add a raising agent to that ? I would assume that you do or is there a french alternative to SR flour?   
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Useful that, Clair, thank you.

[:)]

Problem for me, is where to actually buy the differing types!

Our local Carrefour only stocks Farine de Blé type 55 and 65: anything to do with bread, then it is a complete mix with dried yeast, dried vegetable oil and all the included nastys!

I guess it is probably the big Auchan outside Calais then................

Usually, I have a stock of strong and very strong organic stone-ground bread flour in la belle: but ran out last trip

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I used to use the cheapest most cheerful T55 for all my pastry baking and yorkshire puds and white bread. I would add intermarches own farine complete if I wanted my bread a bit more robust.

I would use Intermarche's farine a gateau avec levure dedans, or something like that, as the levure is the rising agent for cakes. Most french friends would never have bought that, but use plain flour with levure chimique.

Truthfully I keep to as few ingredients in as possible for my baking.

Yes yorkshire pudds should be like cups so you can fill them with beautiful beef gravy.

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[quote user="Gluestick"]Problem for me, is where to actually buy the differing types!

Our local Carrefour only stocks Farine de Blé type 55 and 65: anything to do with bread, then it is a complete mix with dried yeast, dried vegetable oil and all the included nastys![/quote]

I get my T65 bread flour in 5kg bags either from Gamm Vert for €4.80 or from the BioCoop for a little bit more, but they do have a good selection of flours in 1, 5 or 25kg bags.

Your nearest BioCoop in the PdC is

BioCoop Opale Bio (map)

17 rue Edmond Rostand

62200 BOULOGNE SUR MER

Tél : 03 21 32 65 53

Fax : 03 21 32 65 53

lundi : 14h30 à 19h15

mardi au vendredi : 9h30 à 12h30 et 14h30 à 19h15

samedi : 9h00 à 12h30 et 14h30 à 19h15

Mac,

Re SR flour, you can find it in the shop (farine avec poudre levante incorporée), but I simply get a pack of 5 or 10 sachets of levure chimique (equivalent to baking powder) and add some to my plain flour.

See previous discussions:

http://www.completefrance.com/cs/forums/851022/ShowPost.aspx

http://www.completefrance.com/cs/forums/1342020/ShowPost.aspx

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Many thanks, Clair: branches of Gamm Vert are nearest, in point of fact. 12 Km away I see from their website.

Mac:

We've given up using baking powder or similar, mainly due to the rather nasty chemicals added to modern stuff.

Instead, we've gone back into time and make up our own as required.

Simply mix Bicarb to two parts Cream of Tartar.

Cream of Tartar (Tartaric Acid) occurs naturally in wine making.

Make a small amount as it is hygroscopic (i.e. absorbs airborne water).

For SR type flour, simply add the requisite amount to the flour.

Simples.

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I asked my pharmacist for some creme de tartre in France and she sold me a little wrapped packet for about £6. I had asked her to order it in especially so did not feel like I could refuse it.

I only do the mix for my scones, I just love old fashioned scones.
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I use the Anthony Worrell Thompson method for my Yorkshire Puddings - equal quantities.

Take two eggs and break them into a small bowl, then whatever the volume of the eggs use the same measure of plain flour (T45) and then milk, plus a pinch of salt. Beat well and place in the fridge for at least half an hour.  Heat your tray at 200C with a generous amount of oil, or preferably duck or goose fat until very hot.  Pour the batter into the tin and bake for 15-20 mins until well risen and golden.  Makes 12.  (If the tin and fat are hot enough you will see the puddings start to cook whilst pouring in the batter.)

It has never failed me.

Regards - Patricia

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Thanks for the tip Patricia,will give this a try, sounds more like the method my Mother would have used, I have heard conflicting opinions on whether to 'rest'the batter or not, and full cream milk or not, wooden spoon or electric mixer!!! We will overcome!
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As I said, there are probably as many yorkshire pud recipes as there are families in Yorkshire, never mind all the other people in the country.

I sometimes rest my mix, sometimes I don't.

I sometimes use and electric mixer, sometimes I don't.

I sometimes heat the oil/fat, sometimes I don't.

I always use full cream milk and never any water.

Once they are in a properly heated oven, I NEVER open the door until they are risen and golden.

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