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Treatment of wood/beams etc


Wyn
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Being new at all of this - apologies if I sound very green - but I guess we've all got to start somewhere!!

One of the first things we want to do in our house is treat all the wood and timbers etc.  The reports show no sign of termites but evidence of previous activity from woodworm.  Is this a job we should be able to handle ourselves with off the shelf treatments available form the DIY stores or is this a job for the experts?

Thanks

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Not an expert myself but I believe that the chemicals are pretty nasty and a lot of precautions are necessary. I use the DIY stuff for being “very thorough” (e.g. treating the end grain when I cut treated timber and small patches, etc.). For a significant area I would probably try and get it done professionally.

However, I am not an expert and do want to treat an attic (before converting it) and thus would also be interested in what others say.

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Hi,

We did it ourselves, though it has to be admitted that it was a pretty revolting job. On the other hand, if you see any signs of infestation of more serious insects long honred beetles or death watch beetles, it might be as well to get it professionally injected.

Wordworm doesn't much eat into the heartwood, so you don't need to be too agitated about it - if you have hardwood beams. Make sure that ALL softwoods used in the house has been treated, 'cos the little boogers love munching that!

 

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I don't know how true this is but a builder friend once told me that woodworm only goes in an inch at the most, consider the size of the main roof beams, and like to munch old wood rather than new. He also voiced the opinion that folks get all worked up about woodworm in the UK and that really one would have to live for many many years, like 100, before there was sufficient wood munched to cause concern. Mind you this house has stood for over 150 years and the beams are original with lots of evidence of worm whereas the chevrons and lattes were replaced in 1985 and no sign of worm in them yet. As I say I have no idea how true this is but it gives one some comfort...........John not Jackie
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I believe most of the woodworm holes one sees these days are long vacated.

The three things that tend to worry us DESPITE treatment are: spider holes with funnel webbing - they make plenty of sawdust and do not seem to clear off in spite of Xylophene injection, tapping noises at night from death watch beetles somewhere and lifting an oak floor board only to find little piles of sawdust underneath...

Terrifying. 

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What does anyone think about storing firewood in the house?  We have just had some old, rotting oaks cut down and I'm sure the logs are infested with all sorts of things.  The few odd-shaped bits I've brought in to dry out ready for first use next winter are already shedding little piles of sawdust - should I panic and shift them somewhere outside?

Chrissie (81)

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Hi there

Like a lot of things its all down to cost. We started treating our timber and ralised it was going to cost a lot.

DIY material in large cans ranging from €50 - €70 and 2 were required + upon reading the can it was recommended to complete every year.

Over 10year period this would = €500- €700 and no guarantee. Firm of professionals came in did a complete survey used industrial materials all in 1 day and issued a guarantee for 10years and all for under €1000.

So it's really a matter of choice.

Regards

Bono
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Did you use a nationwide or local firm and if nationwide who were they and did they do an OK job ?

I need to get my attic done before starting a conversion and any recommendations are much appreciated (otherwise its “pin in Yellow Pages”).

Thanks

Ian

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Woodworm will go in more than 1 inch - see http://www.alenda.freeserve.co.uk/house3_5.html

This is a beam 6" x 6" and strangely is the only one affected in the room. The remaining wood is about 2 inches thick at its narrowest.

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