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French plumbing


Jenny Rennes
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Can anyone suggest a good book explaining French plumbing systems, preferably in English with schematic diagrams.

I need to put in a completely new system.

All existing plumbing has been removed.

It will be a fairly simple installation serving 2 bathrooms/wc's, and a kitchen.

I don't need to install central heating.

Mercie.

Thanks.
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[quote user="Jenny Rennes"]Can anyone suggest a good book explaining French plumbing systems, preferably in English with schematic diagrams.

I need to put in a completely new system.

All existing plumbing has been removed.

It will be a fairly simple installation serving 2 bathrooms/wc's, and a kitchen.

I don't need to install central heating.

Mercie.

Thanks.[/quote]

We don't know books, just plumbing!

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[quote user="LEO"][quote user="Jenny Rennes"]Can anyone suggest a good book explaining French plumbing systems, preferably in English with schematic diagrams. I need to put in a completely new system. All existing plumbing has been removed. It will be a fairly simple installation serving 2 bathrooms/wc's, and a kitchen. I don't need to install central heating. Mercie. Thanks.[/quote]

We don't know books, just plumbing!


[/quote]

hi ok

             Try    " He unblocked my drains " by John Homes  & Vanessa Del Rio  .. it`s in English with schematic diagrams and also has video sections , starts off a bit placid  but ends up hard to swallow  , but comes up trumps it the end and covers everything in black and white .

                             Dave [8-|]  

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Thanks Pachapapa, I can make good use of your recommendation.

Leo ; for someone who lists 'words' as one of their likes I'd have thought you might read books.

Dave: Thanks for pointing me towards a 1980's porn film.

I get plenty of 'attention' and therefore don't need porn - I'm so sorry that you obviously do !

Mercieeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
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Hi Jenny , if someone wrote a book in english about French plumbing,then had it printed/published they would lose money.

The difference between English and French plumbing is mainly the size of pipe/fittings, otherwise it is the same !

If I were starting from scratch on a french property I would be using JG Speedfit almost entirely!

http://www.johnguest.com/

Kind regards,

Leo

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Thank you Leo, you're a gent.

I'm quite good (for a blonde) at building and I was confident about installing the plumbing until I read that the French use brazed joints whereas we use soldered joints. I'm quite at home with solder but have never brazed. If you think a soldered system will be OK that's good enough for me.
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Not really correct; "soudure" may be effected with a "brasage tendre" ( tin/étain solder), low temperature tin melts at 200°C heat source probably aero-butane temperature 1800°C; or "brasage fort" ( brazing), higher temperature using brazing rods, heat source probably oxy-acetylene. Frankly all this 3 year time served  pseudo-apprentice stuff is out dated in my opinion it is easier to go the PER+ "raccords biconiques" or "raccords à collet mobile" route and keep your butane dry for the summer barbecues.[:)]

Personally I just take a single cold water PER hose to the "bathroom" install a water heater and a few metres of annealed copper pipe or coloured PER. 

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Please don't let this get out of hand.

I have accepted a ticking off from a moderator even though my 'complaint' was said tongue in cheek and was meant to be humourous ! (as was my reply to Dave.)

Is it me ?

Does everone who subscribes to this forum eventually lose their sense of fun ?

Life's too short guys.

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Don't worry Jenny, some do and some don't. Sometimes people write things in a rush as they are 'going out the door' etc and they don't always come over as they are meant. Usually if people don't know a question may be left un-answered or a person who does know only logs on now and again. Don't take it personally, every forum has some 'grumpy old men'. [;-)]
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 When you are saying something tongue in cheek etc it helps to use the smileys, fifth box from the left, drop down box above the posting space.

The internet is a wonderful resource but its sometimes hard to guess someones tone......you are not the only one to fall foul of this so don't feel bad. [:)]

Patience is not my strong suit either ![;-)]

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LOL We don't 'subscribe' to anything, we just join this board.

My sense of humour is intact thankyou, never fancied being a bit of a joker on here to tell the truth, but I do make friends laugh that is for sure and after rather a long time together still make my husband laugh.

Your request was rather odd really. My husband could probably have answered, but he doesn't come on here, and I have no interest in plumbing. And we had to learn things the hard way, no silly internet to help us out.

Suggestion, go to Castorama, look at what is available and they actually, (well ours did), have little learning sessions on lots of DIY things including plumbing, they had a little gradin and a blackboard set up.

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Curiously I have the following book out from the local library:

http://www.priceminister.com/offer/buy/69807702/Cristophe-Et-Michel-Branchu-Plomberie-Et-Electricite---Mode-D-emploi-Livre.html

retailed by France Loisirs; it is a combination of the authors works on plomberie & électricité. It has more diagrams than words and is easily digested; like I have read 100 pages over two mugs of coffee sitting in the garden. I would say an ideal way to cover the basics and at the same time assimilate the french words attached to the "metier".

OT Also reading the following book from library, a delightful read;

http://www.amazon.fr/Chaux-naturelle-D%C3%A9corer-restaurer-construire/dp/2841565602

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[quote user="Nick Trollope"]Without getting embroiled in stupid arguments about a)The difference between UK and French plumbing or b) patience, I'd recommend that you do what every professional (new build) plumber that I know does; Use PER and forget copper....[/quote]

Personally I just take a single cold water PER hose to the "bathroom" install a water heater and a few metres of annealed copper pipe or coloured PER.


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[quote user="Nick Trollope"]Without getting embroiled in stupid arguments about a)The difference between UK and French plumbing or b) patience, I'd recommend that you do what every professional (new build) plumber that I know does; Use PER and forget copper....[/quote]

Nick, I posted a query about multicouche a week or so back and got no replies. Edit (Sorry!! Teapot replied!!) I still have 2 jobs to do; first move a radiator, and two plumb in a shower and washbasin. I'm thinking about using "plastic" piping, but what is best (and easiest) for a radiator? I'm already fixed on the idea of multicouche for the bathroom supply.

Sorry to hijack this thread!!

 

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[quote user="Jenny Rennes"]Please don't let this get out of hand.

I have accepted a ticking off from a moderator even though my 'complaint' was said tongue in cheek and was meant to be humourous ! (as was my reply to Dave.)

Is it me ?

Does everone who subscribes to this forum eventually lose their sense of fun ?

Life's too short guys.[/quote]

Hi Jenny,

I will be standing  on the corner by the church Saturday 8pm !

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Sid (sorry I can't do quotes because I am not using IE),

PER is fine for everything - cold and hot and radiators. The only time you shouldn't use it is within about 1M of a boiler. So, all the wood boilers that we install we use copper to a manifold and PER thereafter. "Just like the French".

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Nick

I need to move a radiator which is currently plumbed in copper; will it look neat in PER? From what I've seen (in catalogues) it's not rigid, so may look a bit bendy? Can you do 90 degree bends (like an elbow) with it? How does "multicouche " compare?

Sorry for all these questions on a thread about another plumbing query!

Sid

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I've just started pumbing an extension with multi-couche . I'm sold on it.. Very very malleable, but keeps it shape when bent as opposed to PER(does not need angle formers) . Can bend any angle by hand (have tried up to 90deg so far. Its easy to cut (using standard PER cutters) . It can be fitted external or hidden(without gaine), and can also be covered in concrete directly. (it is also used for underfloor heating circuits). Apparently another advantage over PER is that it does not expand under pressure. Long runs of PER can create a rush of pressure when a tap is opened and the pipe contracts. Of course the downside is that Its more expensive than PER.
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