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jsb

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  1. Hi there, as everyone has said: you don't pay capital gains tax on your principle residence, however, to be a principle residence you have to have proof that you have lived there: as someone pointed out: be a part of the social security system or be registered to pay taxes. The good news is that, your second home, isn't liable for capital gains tax, after 15 years. If you have owned it for 10 years, your capital gains tax (of around 30%) is reduced by 50%. In another 5 years you won't pay anything. This applies even if you have rented out your property and made financial gain.

    Good luck with your retirement.
  2. I help people with their admin and one of my clients has had the same request for money after setting up as an auto-entrepreneur. In France, you, almost always, have to sign to say you agree to pay. Without a signature there is nothing they can do. Eg. if you have had your car fixed and then the bill is higher than your original quote. Unless you have signed to say that you will pay the higher amount, you are only eligible to pay for the amount you signed for. Just ignore it and ask them to send a copy of the signed paperwork by registered post.
  3. Hi, I had my little boy vaccinated as and when his vaccinations came up.  It's such a personal decision that no-one can tell you what to do.  I have the theory (and there will be many people who think that I am not very responsible) that something can happen at any time with our children.  To me, as long as my son is vaccinated I know that there is less for me to worry about.  You also have to note that in France, in order to be accepted into collective care, eg. the crèche or school, your child must be vaccinated and you must provide proof, ie. the vaccinations page in your child's carnet de santé.

    Good luck with your decision.

    Sarah

  4. Sorry, my last message was a little late... but you can work without your SIRET no, you just need to re-invoice when it eventually comes through.  You can work from the start date that you have given on your application. 
  5. As from the 16th Feb you can register as AE if your profession isn't regulated.  If it is, then within the next few weeks (within a month, the man on the help line told me), you'll be able to register.  Hope that helps.

  6. I have a livebox (Orange) and a live phone and have had exactly the same problems.  I have had to change my modem and it seems to be OK now.  I was extremely doubtful if it was the modem as, like you, my internet connection worked fine.  For us, I think it was the electricity supply cutting out which caused problems.  It can also be if you've had stormy weather.  Both France Telecom & my husband laughed when I asked if it was because of the snow!!!!!  Good luck. 
  7. I have also been trying to find this out and can only find the same sites which talk about importing cars.  We have now registered a couple of cars from the UK and one from Italy.  Not because we couldn't find anyone to insure it, but because we were stuck when we wanted to take the car back to the UK.  Our road tax had run out and we couldn't re-tax it without UK insurance or MOT for which we needed an UK address.  As insurance companies are the same the world over, if your car is not taxed, they will find a way out of not paying, regardless of whether you have a CT.  I also have the theory that as we've made the decision to move to France, it's easier all round if we move everything and not just some things.  It's far easier all round.
  8. Thanks for that, you mentioned the signed booking form which was going to be another question.  In an age where more and more people seem to blame everyone else for problems and accidents which are just that, how do you cover yourself for any claims?  My plan is that the chalet would be self catered, but I don't want anyone saying for example: that the open fire burnt little Johnny when he put his hands into it, or that someone fell off the mezzanine.  The house is built to all norms and standards, but having worked in a bar where people would claim that they were due something as they'd banged their heads on a stone archway, nothing would surprise me.  Is it legal to put that we're not liable for any incidents which take place? 
  9. We're planning on renting out our chalet in the alps during the winter months and I'd like to know how people normally pay.  We live here all year round and the income will be declared here in France, although I am expecting most of our customers to be from the UK.  Is it worth getting a CB machine, or do most people prefer paying into a UK bank account?  I will be asking for a deposit and am thinking of asking for the amount to be paid in full before arrival.  That way there are no money worries on either side.  Any opinions?   

  10. I've tried this already on the legal site but had no answers, so I'm changing tactics!  Can anyone tell me how renting out part of our house (our house is our full time residence and we would be renting for the winter season only) would affect our taxes, foncière & habitation.  Even better, if someone knows how this would affect the capital gains tax, when we decide to sell it.  When we bought the house it needed lots and lots of work, the house is now worth 3 or 4 times as much.  We don't know if it's worth going down the renting route or to just leave it.  From experience, every time I ask a question at our local tax office, I end up with various forms to fill out meaning that we pay more tax so any help would be appreciated.
  11. We live in the alps and there are loads of places which sell reclaimed wood as it's chalet country.  However, we can also order it at our local Point P.  Whether this is just because of the area, I don't know, but it's worth asking.   You could also try asking at your local builders yard or wood yard.  Hope this helps. 
  12. We have a house which is our main residence and where we have lived for over 3 years.  We bought the house needing lots of renovations which we have done ourselves and the house is worth much more than when we bought it.  As it's far too big for the two of us, we're thinking of renting part of it out, just for the winter season (we live in the alps).  Can anyone tell us how this will affect us if and when we come to sell it and would it be affected even if we just tried it for one winter? 
  13. [quote]We have just found a beautiful converted barnwhich we'd love to buy but it lacks oneessential for us - a fireplace / chimney. Wehave been told that it's possible to installa woodburner + flue & would ...[/quote]

    We bought an old farmhouse which we had fallen in love with in the Alps. To do anything at all with the outside, ie. change windows, shutters etc we needed planning permission. The local Mairie were very helpful and told us everything we needed permission for and roughly how long it would take. No architect was needed although relatively professional looking drawings were required. Although we wanted to make many changes it eventually only took about 6 weeks for the planning permission to come through.

    One of the changes we wanted to make was a new chimney. From the top of the fire to the top of the chimney is about 5/6 metres. As our room was so big we chose a foyer rather than a wood burning stove as it would have looked too small. If you find a stove chack whether the flue comes out of the top of the stove or from the back. Some come out in both places. A foyer is another way of having a wood burner but you would need a fireplace built as well. I'm not sure what look you'd prefer but it's always worth a look.

    By the way, my husband has built the chimney and it hasn't cost as much as we were originally quoted for the insulated tubes. About 300 euros.

    Sarah
  14. [quote]We have just found a beautiful converted barnwhich we'd love to buy but it lacks oneessential for us - a fireplace / chimney. Wehave been told that it's possible to installa woodburner + flue & would ...[/quote]

    We bought an old farmhouse which we had fallen in love with in the Alps. To do anything at all with the outside, ie. change windows, shutters etc we needed planning permission. The local Mairie were very helpful and told us everything we needed permission for and roughly how long it would take. No architect was needed although relatively professional looking drawings were required. Although we wanted to make many changes it eventually only took about 6 weeks for the planning permission to come through.

    One of the changes we wanted to make was a new chimney. From the top of the fire to the top of the chimney is about 5/6 metres. As our room was so big we chose a foyer rather than a wood burning stove as it would have looked too small. If you find a stove chack whether the flue comes out of the top of the stove or from the back. Some come out in both places. A foyer is another way of having a wood burner but you would need a fireplace built as well. I'm not sure what look you'd prefer but it's always worth a look.

    Sarah
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