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Rivington

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Everything posted by Rivington

  1. We have friends who lived in France for the past 4 years, but have only just registered to pay French tax. The question is, will the French back date, and ask for the tax for the last 4 years, or will they accept the date of declaration as the starting point? The problem for them, is that there is a question on the Form France - Individual, which asks if they want to claim repayment of taxes from the UK, (presumably for the years they should have been paying tax here.) They would only want to do this if the French ask for the tax to be back-dated, but as they don't know the answer to that, they cannot complete the form properly! Has anyone had experience of this please and can help?
  2. Hi We have already owned our house here in France for the last 11 yrs and have have lived here permanently for 3. Our neighbour has just informed us that he would like to sell the piece of land adjoining ours, and would we like to buy it? Would we ever!! This was one of those moments you can normally only dream about - a definite lottery winning moment! because our neighbour has a right of passage across our land right across the front of our lounge window, to the road! We have always wanted this piece of land!! He is very keen to point out all the advantages to us should we wish to buy it, but we are trying to keep very cool about it, and refrain from snatching his hand off and of course not looking at all too eager - which of course we are! The land is about 3,000 sq m and can be built on, as it once had a little house on it, although it is landlocked and surrounded on 3 sides by fields. Is there a generally accepted price for such land? Also we are not too sure now of the steps to take once he has told us how much he would like for the land. I know we will have to go to the notaire to sort things out, but what are the stages to go through to buy it - it's 11 yrs since we bought the house! Thanks Carole
  3. Does anyone know if it's possible to get a bus from London to Limoges? It used to be possible, as a friend of mine did it, but we're going back about 10 yrs now. I've tried to look on the internet, but haven't had any luck, so thought I'd ask all of you. thanks Carole
  4. Hi There are loos, which are 2 steps up inside the library building. I do hope this won't put you off, as this is our first venture of its kind and we really want everyone to come and make it a success. The weather forecast is now looking decidely better than it was a couple of days ago! Carole
  5. Hi everyone If you're in or around Dun-le-Palestel this Saturday ( 4th July) the volunteers at the English Library, Parc Benjamin Bord, in Dun, have organised an English Garden fete which begins at 2.00pm We are part of an English / French group Entente Cordiale www.ententecordiale-creuse.org and this is to be a fundraiser to enhance the facilities in the library. Both French and English people are involved in this and there will, as part of the afternoon's entertainment, be cream teas and a display of traditional English country dancing, including Morris dancing. The dancers are an English / French group, made up of library volunteers and other members of Entente Cordiale, who have been practising hard for many weeks and are now ready for public scrutiny - well we sincerely hope so anyway!![:D] Do come along and support us, it should be a great afternoon! Carole
  6. Hi, I just wondered if anyone has been to the English library in Dun-le-Palastel, near La Souterraine in the Creuse?  It's open on Thursdays 10 till 4 (market day) and Saturdays 9.30 till 12.30 and is staffed by volunteers. It's situated just next door to the French library and there is an impressive range of books, over 5000 now!  plus videos, DVDs etc.  It's a very friendly place to have a chat and a coffee whilst choosing  books etc. So if you love reading, having a chat, and catching up with the local news etc it's a great place to while away an hour or so. Carole
  7. I just wondered if anyone has been to the English library in Dun-le-Palastel?  It's open on Thursdays 10 till 4 and Saturdays 9.30 till 12.30 and is staffed by volunteers. There is an impressive range of books, over 5000!  plus videos, DVDs etc. We really enjoy our fortnightly visits and have found it a very friendly place to have a chat and a coffee whilst choosing our books etc. I must say if you like reading and having a chat, it's a great place to while away an hour or so.    
  8. I have not yet joined the French health service as we have only been here 2 months and things have been quite hectic healthwise since then. I have taken out full temporary health insurance until my problems are resolved - I am still in the care of a consultant in the uk and for the time being don't want to change to a french one at the moment, although that is my intention eventually. My immediate problem is that I need to get a blood test done and haven't done this before in france. Do I go to the local doctor (who does know me) and ask for one, or do I find a lab and go directly there as someone has suggested? I have the necessary forms from my doctor in uk who does know that I will be getting it done in France.
  9. thanks for that everyone. [:)] I sort of knew it could be used on the garden but wasn't sure exactly how to do it. The compost heap is my next goal. We only arrived here permanently 2 months ago and what with Christmas and everything haven't had time to think about it except every time I see the OH carrying out anther load of ash and asking me where to put it ! Thanks a lot Carole
  10. I'm sure many people will think this a daft question, but here goes anyway - what do people do with all the ash from their woodburners? I know it can be used in the garden but am not sure of the best way to do this. When I was a child, the ash from the coal fire was just put in the bin as far as I can remember. I'm sure someone out there has a briliant suggestion as to how to use it / dispose of it! Carole
  11. I was actually grateful a few weeks ago when with a party of schoolchildren (10/11 yr olds) in St Omer, I was explaining to them at the kerb of a zebra crossing that they must look LEFT  first, then right and that even though they were stood at the kerb they should not expect drivers to stop. Lo and behold at least three cars passed over the crossing without even slowing down as I spoke. It gave me a great deal of "cred" I can tell you and taught them a valuable lesson to boot![8-|]
  12. Hi! we bought our house near Crozant, Creuse about seven years ago and are planning to move permanently just as soon as our uk house is sold. (of course in the present climate we could be in our graves before that happens!)  [:'(] I have been having some misgivings about the the fact that we bought with a clause en tontine. We were advised at the time that it was fine for us as we have only ever been married to each other and have two children from the marriage. It was an article in the LF magazine about the changes in succession tax which began to worry me. There is no longer inheritance tax to pay between spouses, which I assume applies to the en tontine regime as well, but there was a suggestion that this may not last. The clause has never been looked on favourably apparently, because it is possible that one's children could be disinherited by it in some circumstances, it was suggested that the tax might be reinstated between husbands and wives in this case. I know the regime can be changed to the communaute universelle (?) don't think that's the right spelling! -but I'm not sure exactly what that is and whether it would be better. I'm sure there are lots of knowledgeable people out there who can help and I would welcome the advice![8-)]
  13. As it happens I'm in the process of doing the very same thing myself and I have to tell you that it hasn't been an easy ride, but I'm trying to think positive as it's what I really want and I'm sure all will be well in the end! In complete agreement with the OP - they're as rare as hen's teeth in France, they ARE available, but expensive. If you look online for "fours double encastrables" you will find perhaps 2 or 3 and the one I bought was the De Deitrich. They are much cheaper in the UK and of course there are hundreds of them, but as we wern't sure about the electricity supply being compatible we decided to go the french route, . I ordered one online ( I had done this easily a couple of years ago in the UK) paid my money and waited for the delivery. It didn't arrive![:-))] The company didn't ring or email and as my French isn't quite up to it, I had to get someone to ring them for me. They gave us a new delivery date a few days later - apparently the delivery man forgot to deliver it! - and guess what? it didn't arrive again!! [:-))][:-))] This time they said it was damaged. We then asked for our money back, and I have to say they were quite prompt about that, but I was still left without an oven.[:'(] As the new kitchen was being fitted at the time we were a bit stuck and I was reluctant to try the internet again, so my OH decided we should try the little electrical shop in our nearest small town. I must admit I didn't hold out much hope, but we went armed with picture and details of the oven. The very efficient young lady in the shop said she would ring her suppliers and within two minutes she said it would be here two days later!! [:D] We did have to pay more for it - they can't give the discount the big companies can - but I was so relieved I didn't mind any more. Sorry if this is not very encouraging, but I am getting what I wanted in the end! Our trusty french electrician knows the people in the shop and I have left it to him to collect and install it  - (we're back in the UK now till next month.) Other companies online may be better, the one I used suggested they were  "ButLessExpensive" I would have preferred it if they were "ButMoreReliable!!" Personally, I didn't want to risk it again, it was too much money to be messing around with.   Bon courage, Carole      
  14. Hi we have a fairly big garden - about 2000sq m with lots of trees including huge pines, hazels, fruit and nut trees. We also have a huge area of grass (and it seems sometimes at least one mole for every sq metre! [:-))] the little dears!] What I need to know is how to make really good compost. I've never done it before, but now that we are planning to be in France full time as soon as our house is sold, as a complete composting novice, I would really like some tips as to how to start, what to put in and what to avoid, how to manage it etc. I'm sure there are lots of you out there who have some great ideas to share [:)] thanks Carole
  15. Congratulations on your move Steve, we will be following you some time this year just as soon as we have sold our house, which we're putting on the market in the next week or two. I retired last July and my OH will retire as soon as we have a buyer, We can't wait! We're near Crozant, so not too far from you, we have had our house since 2000 and personally I can't wait NOT to have to pack up and leave just when you're feeling relaxed and enjoying yourself. . What is the most daunting thing at the moment is trying to make some kind of sense of all the things we will have to do in the next six months or so, both at the English end and in France. You will have been through the same kind of thing I guess, estate agents, solicitors, bank accounts in England, forms from Newcastle, removal van, medical info, etc., etc., my head's spinning just putting a few things down here! [:-))] It would be interesting to hear how you're getting on with sorting out the paperwork now you're resident. How easy have you found it to sort out the medical insurance, CPAM, car etc. I, and I'm sure lots of others, would be very interested to hear. Carole  
  16. We too are going to be in France this year for Christmas (first time)and my worry is that as Christmas eve is on a Monday, (shops usually close on Mondays) will this still happen as it's the day before Christmas? We will only arrive Saturday afternoon, next day is Sunday, so shops will also be closed. I'm just not sure what to bring with us - foodwise that is. Carole
  17. I'm really glad you have found the ash and goo in the flue before you set fire to the house as I almost did! [:'(] I'm sure there'll be an avalanche of advice about getting the chimney cleaned once a year - I learned the hard way! I did know you should, but I kept thinking as it was a second home and it hadn't been used that much, it wouldn't need it yet. Wrong! I hope others will take this as cautionary tale! [:'(][:(] It's amazing how time flies when you're having fun, but we really hadn't realized it was actually about 6 yrs ago that we put the stove / flue in new! I was on my own in France at the time - actually this October - I was on the phone to hubby in the uk one evening, when suddenly I began to hear the sound of something falling down the flue pipe on the poelle in the kitchen, then I noticed that the pipe had begun to glow red!! I stupidly said "it shouldn't be red, should it?" within a minute the red glow had crept further and further up until it had almost reached the wooden boarding in the chimney! "I've got to go!" I shouted, and flew out of the house to get my ever obliging french neighbour who came running in. He put on the fireproof gants and got his wife to get a huge tin bucket. He pulled the poele forward a bit and pulled the pipe away from the back and it fell into the bucket, red hot ash and all!! He was excellent and I know without him there would have been a disaster. I was so grateful and scared. I got a well deserved ticking off for not cleaning the flues and was told to get two buches rammonage the next day (we have a stove in the lounge as well) I did and used them both, although the kitchen one had been emptied! He said to send off the certificates that came with them for the insurance, but I'm not sure they will accept them as proof I have have the chimneys cleaned, will they? I was going to go into the office on our next trip and ask them. This was a lesson very well learned! [:$] Carole
  18. thanks so much rothrugby it all seems a lot clearer now![:D] I think the problem has been that there are so many different situations that people find themselves in, that it's really difficult sorting the wood from the trees! I think our situation is relatively simple - (at the moment) we await with interest any further developments on the healthcare front ! We only envisage a problem if spouses are stopped from sharing an E121 when only one of you is of state pension age - my husband will then have to get an E106 for two years and then take out private insurance for the remaining 3 yrs until he is 65. This would not be a major catastrophe and much more preferable to his working in  a very stressful job till he reaches 65! [:'(]   Carole
  19. I know this is an old question, but I need clarification if possible. My OH and I will move permanently to France in Apr/May 2009 when we will both be 60. As things stand now, I will then be entitled to an E121 and OH will be able to benefit from it too. What I'm not too clear about is what exactly we will then have to pay in terms of top up insurance or anything else come to that. Are there any concessions for people entitled to a state pension or who have chronic conditions? my husband is type 2 diabetic. I know this sounds as though I haven't done any research, but I actually have! it's just the more I read, the more confused I get!  [8-)] Carole
  20. We are spending Christmas at our French house for the first time this year and wonder if turkeys and uncooked gammon hams are readily available. Although we do want to find out and maybe join in,[:)] whatever our neighbours are doing, it would be nice to be able to do a bit of forward planning! Carole
  21. Thanks Helen, we had been wondering if the local electical shop could do that, or even our wonderful local electrician, whose greatest joy is to complain about the work of all other electricians who have, over the years, done work on our house! [:)] I have taken on board comments made by people about maybe going for gas due to the regular power cuts we have in the Limousin - we are near Crozant - we had a four hour cut one evening in August! luckily the woodburner in the kitchen has a small hotplate so we were at least able to boil a pan of water for a cup of coffee.[:D] so thanks everyone, some useful ideas and advice for which I am very grateful. Carole I think I've got the hang of the smiley things now - famous last words!  [:P]
  22. Thanks for your reply Nickel, did you actually buy the DeDietrich oven? I have seen it on the internet and it does seem to be the most reasonably priced, but haven't heard of them before- (the only other one I found was a Neff at over 1300€ which was the other reason we were thinking of buying it in the uk! )  we should be alright power wise as we augmented our supply a couple of years ago and have a15kw supply which runs radiators as well. Carole
  23. We are revamping our kitchen and as I have a chronic back problem I am unable to deal with an under worktop oven. I also miss having a grill in the top oven as I have in England ( we are moving to France permanently next year and want to get this sorted first) I have searched the shops and the internet and realise that whilst single ovens are available everywhere, double ovens are as rare as hen's teeth in France!  My question is - would the wiring etc be very different if we brought one out from England or do people think a good electrician will be able to sort it out? Carole  (Essex and Limousin - but not for long!)
  24. Rivington

    Loirs??

    [:(] We haven't quite submitted completely yet, but feel more drastic measures may be needed. We are coming to the conclusion that the only way to keep them out is to have the outside of the house repointed to try to stop them coming in through the walls, but it would have to be a superb job, - no nooks or crannies whatsoever! They can get in through the tiniest sliver in the walls. I actually found one had commited hari kari under the shed door - the gap must have been all of half a centimetre. The result was that I couldn't get it out! It had decomposed before I saw it (we're only part timers as yet) and it was one he** of a job to even open the door, and once I had it open, I could neither prise the creature out, or shut the door! As to what they look like, - unfortunately they look quite cute! They are fairly big, about 10-12 cms long (minus the tail, which is quite fluffy) and have quite big eyes. They have a kind of dark marking on their heads and are apparently quite long lived, (in the natural scheme of things[6]!!) about 13 years I once read. bonne chance!  Carole
  25. Rivington

    Loirs??

     [:(] We haven't quite submitted completely yet, but feel more drastic measures may be needed. We are coming to the conclusion that the only way to keep them out is to have the outside of the house repointed to try to stop them coming in through the walls, but it would have to be a superb job, - no nooks or crannies whatsoever! They can get in through the tiniest sliver in the walls. I actually found one had commited hari kari under the shed door - the gap must have been all of half a centimetre. The result was that I couldn't get it out! It had decomposed before I saw it (we're only part timers as yet) and it was one he** of a job to even open the door, and once I had it open, I could neither prise the creature out, or shut the door! As to what they look like, - unfortunately they look quite cute! They are fairly big, about 10-12 cms long (minus the tail, which is quite fluffy) and have quite big eyes. They have a kind of dark marking on their heads and are apparently quite long lived, (in the natural scheme of things[6]!!) about 13 years I once read. bonne chance!  Carole
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